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2019 Speaker Interviews, Speakers, TEDxColumbus

A TEDxColumbus interview with Speaker Christian Family, Esq., owner of Christian Family Law.

 

TEDxColumbus: Can you tell us a little about yourself?

CF: I am a lawyer, mother, and transformation facilitator.  I grew up in Cleveland, attended an inner-city high school, graduated from the University of Rochester and earned my law degree from Case Western Reserve University. I own Christian Family Law, PC, a fast growing law firm where we help recreate families in a healthy way. I was a SAHM for 2 years with my now 7 year-old daughter. My two sons age 5 and 2 only know me as a working mom.  My vision for my life is abundance, influence, and peace and I strive to live according to those principles.

 

TEDxColumbus: What do others consider to be the most surprising thing about you?

CR: I legally changed my name to Christian Family in 2018.

 

TEDxColumbus: What inspired your interest in TEDxColumbus?

CF: Reframing the paradigm around divorce is an idea worth sharing, so there is no better forum than TEDxColumbus.

 

TEDxColumbus: What are you most looking forward to as a TEDxColumbus speaker?

CF: I am most looking forward to seeing the light bulb go on in the eyes of the audience when new ideas are planted.

 

TEDxColumbus: What inspires you about the future of Columbus?

CF: I am most inspired by the fact that Columbus’s best day is yet to come. It is a city with a future.

 

TEDxColumbus: When you host visitors from outside of Columbus, where will you typically take them?

CF: I take guests to Shadowbox Live, COSI, and the zoo.

 

TEDxColumbus: If you could give advice to yourself as a high school student, what would it be?

CF: Success is the result of changing how you perceive failure.   Successful people never fail; they win or they learn.

 

TEDxColumbus: What is your favorite book and why?

CF: The Four Agreements by Don Miguel Ruiz.  The principles are universal and always relevant. It’s a life-hack for an abundant life.

 

And just for fun:

TEDxColumbus: Dog or Cat

CF: cat

 

TEDxColumbus: Netflix or Theater

CF: theater

 

TEDxColumbus: Form or Function

CF: Function

 

TEDxColumbus: Beach or Mountains

CF: Beach

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2019 Speaker Interviews, Speakers, TEDxColumbus

A TEDxColumbus interview with Speaker Dr. Tim Raderstorf the Chief Innovation Officer at The Ohio State University College of Nursing.

 

TEDxColumbus: Can you tell us a little about yourself?

TR: I’m a husband, soon-to-be father of three, and all-around curious guy.  Many twists and turns led me to a career in nursing, where I became the first nurse named a Chief Innovation Officer in academia. Truthfully, I’ve gotten really lucky in my life.  Some of that luck resulted just from getting started and staying naïve enough to keep going. A healthy combination of naiveté and curiosity has led me to try things well beyond my scope, like build my own garage, start businesses, and found a maker-space. I’ve learned to “trust my instincts, close my eyes, and leap.”

 

TEDxColumbus: What do others consider to be the most surprising thing about you?

TR: I’m a nurse, really, I’m actually a nurse.

 

TEDxColumbus: What inspired your interest in TEDxColumbus?

TR: I truly believe that everyone has a great idea to change the world; they just don’t know where to begin.  I hope my story gives others the confidence to take their first steps toward changing the world.

 

TEDxColumbus: What previous TED or TEDxColumbus talk was most meaningful to you?

TR: The first TED talk I ever saw was Simon Sinek’s How Great Leaders Inspire Action https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=qp0HIF3SfI4
His Golden Circle approach was life-changing and inspiring.

 

TEDxColumbus: What inspires you about the future of Columbus?

TR: We’ve built one of the most collaboratively-competitive environments in the world.  Our desire to help others succeed will be the foundation of Columbus’ success over the next 10 years.

 

TEDxColumbus: When you host visitors from outside of Columbus, where will you typically take them?

TR: The North Market

 

TEDxColumbus: If you could give advice to yourself as a high school student, what would it be?

TR: Don’t be in such a hurry to grow up and take more risks.

 

TEDxColumbus: How did you select your career choice?

TR: It took me a long time and in many ways the nursing profession selected me. I went from wanting to be a doctor, then a teacher, then a nurse. No I am a Doctor/Nurse/Professor/Chief Innovation Officer. Weird.

 

And just for fun:

TEDxColumbus: Dog or Cat

TR: Dog

 

TEDxColumbus: Netflix or Theater

TR: Netflix

 

TEDxColumbus: Facebook or Twitter

TR: Neither

 

TEDxColumbus: Form or Function

TR: Function

 

TEDxColumbus: Beach or Mountain

TR: Both!

 

TEDxColumbus: Big Party or Small Gathering

TR: Small Gathering

 

TEDxColumbus: Summer or Winter

TR: Winter

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2019 Speaker Interviews, Speakers, TEDxColumbus

A TEDxColumbus interview with Speaker Saideepika Rayala is the founder of the Columbus Civic, an email newsletter focused specifically on various immigrant and refugee communities

 

TEDxColumbus: Can you tell us a little about yourself?

SR: I am a senior at Olentangy Liberty High School, and a journalist who is passionate about using journalism to empower immigrant and refugee communities. I am the editor-in-chief of my school newspaper and have interned at various local news organizations. In 2018, I used the skills and interest I had to create a news organization called The Columbus Civic. The organization provides the local news of Columbus, Ohio in the native languages of different communities. One day, I hope to bridge the gap between immigrant communities and newsrooms.

 

TEDxColumbus: What do others consider to be the most surprising thing about you?

SR: Most people become surprised to find that I am a target archer and a level 1 archery instructor since it is a very niche sport.  

 

TEDxColumbus: What inspired your interest in TEDxColumbus?

SR: The first time I encountered TEDxColumbus was when I got to volunteer at the TedxColumbus 2017 event. As a volunteer, when we were done serving all the guests, we got to sneak into the back of the theatre and listen to some of the speakers. I remember sitting there being awed by how passionate the speakers were about the topics they were speaking on. It inspired me to search for a topic that I was really passionate about – and maybe even get to do a TED talk about it.

 

 

TEDxColumbus: What inspires you about the future of Columbus?

SR: In my school, the places I have volunteered at, or even at the TEDx auditions, I have had the opportunity to meet some incredible people who have big dreams about the future. Those people that are not willing to sit and be complacent, but instead want to be out in the world doing things and making a change, make me excited about the future of Columbus.

 

TEDxColumbus: If you could give advice to yourself as a high school student, what would it be?

SR: As a senior in high school, this advice would be for the dazed and confused freshman that I was four years ago. I would say it’s okay to not have everything figuredout. Take some time to find the things you are interested in, and once you do, put everything you got into those select few interests. I would also tell myself to get involved in the community around me whether it be the school community or the outside community. Working to better your community and knowing that you were able to make a change – no matter how little that change may be – is a very rewarding thing when you look back on your four years of high school.

 

And just for fun:

 

TEDxColumbus: Dog or Cat

SR: Dog

 

TEDxColumbus: Facebook or Twitter

SR: Twitter

 

TEDxColumbus: Work Hard or Play Hard

SR: Work hard, and then play hard

 

TEDxColumbus: Summer or Winter

SR: Summer

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2019 Speaker Interviews, Speakers, TEDxColumbus

A TEDxColumbus interview with Speaker Alexander Wendt, Professor of Political Science, Mershon Professor of International Security, The Ohio State University

 

TEDxColumbus: Can you tell us a little about yourself?

AW: I am a professor of political science at Ohio State, specializing in the philosophy  of international relations.  I have also long had a side-interest in anomalous phenomena, and in 2008 published the only academic article I know of that takes UFOs seriously.

 

TEDxColumbus: What do others consider to be the most surprising thing about you?

AW: The fact that I like metal.

 

TEDxColumbus: Have to ask, what is your favorite band?

AW: That’s a tough one, with so much good music out there!  I’d have to say Avenged Sevenfold or Slipknot, depending on my mood; can we go with both?

 

TEDxColumbus: What inspired your interest in TEDxColumbus?

AW: I’ve heard about it for years from my neighbor and in this case I was encouraged to actually apply by one of your organizers.

 

TEDxColumbus: What are you most looking forward to as a TEDxColumbus speaker?

AW: My ideas reaching as large an audience as possible.

 

TEDxColumbus: What inspires you about the future of Columbus?

AW: The presence of so many talented, forward-thinking and socially conscious young people

 

TEDxColumbus: If you could give advice to yourself as a high school student, what would it be?

AW: Don’t change a thing, or I wouldn’t be as lucky as I am today.

 

TEDxColumbus: How did you select your career choice?

AW: I didn’t have any other skills and my father was a professor, so it was a natural path to follow.

 

And just for fun:

TEDxColumbus: Phone Call or Text

AW: Phone call

 

TEDxColumbus: Facebook or Twitter

AW: Facebook

 

TEDxColumbus: Beach or Mountains

AW: Mountains

 

TEDxColumbus: Big Party or Small Gathering

AW: Small Gathering

 

TEDxColumbus: Train or Plane

AW: Train

Interested in Alexander’s music choices? Check them out here: https://www.alexanderwendt.org/my-metal

Alexander will be taking the main stage at 2019 TEDxColumbus: Spark.  You can read his bio here.

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Follow This, Speakers, TEDxColumbus

jess mathewsby Alessandra Wollner 

“Let me tell you what I think of bicycling,” Susan B. Anthony told New York Times reporter Nellie Bly. “I think it has done more to emancipate women than anything else in the world. It gives women a feeling of freedom and self-reliance. I stand and rejoice every time I see a woman ride by on a wheel…the picture of free, untrammeled womanhood.”

That was back in 1896, when feminists called bicycles “freedom machines.” At the time, for women at least, bikes were kind of a big deal. They offered mobility and ushered in an era of vastly less restrictive ladies’ attire. Bloomers, y’all.

But somehow, as the years revolved, bike culture became the provenance of dudes. Dudes wearing caps with tiny bills, walking bowlegged on ripped calves. The era of Susan B.’s freedom machine may be over, but a bike-powered women’s revolution is alive and well in the work of Jess Mathews, who gave a 2013 TEDxColumbus talk about the integral role women play in creating bike-friendly cities.

On the day that I met Jess Mathews, she rolled up on Suzette—that’s her Fuji hybrid—with a copy of Amy Poehler’s Yes Please in a wicker basket attached to the handlebars, also tricked out with a hot pink little bell. Suzette’s pedals are electric raspberry blue, her saddle striped down the middle with leopard print fleece. Laminated cards with pictures of bikes twine through the spokes of her back wheel, and stickers for various causes wrap her peach sherbet frame. It’s a bike lovingly customized by a woman as free and untrammeled as they come. No doubt, Jess Mathews is the kind of bicycling woman Susan B. would rejoice to see.

Wheels & Heels 1

Jess has always been vocal about women and biking, lobbying the local government for infrastructure that makes women and children feel safe to ride. And though she is fiercely dedicated to this work, it’s just a spoke in her wheel. One speed out of ten. A single stop on a long and comprehensive tour to transform Columbus into a leading center not just in bike friendliness, but in the creative and civic-minded use of city streets.

Because Jess’ work ranges all over the city, I asked her to tour me through the sites of her greatest successes, and take us through Columbus’ best examples of bike-friendliness and worst instances of bike-indifference. On bikes. Duh.

A number of places we pedaled by were sites of the Columbus Parklet Project and Open Streets Columbus, both initiatives under Transit Columbus, which “champions an integrated public transportation system for the people of Central Ohio to improve the safety, health, environment and economic vitality of the entire Columbus region.” The organization launched both Open Streets and Columbus Parklets in 2015. “I’d been talking and dreaming about these projects for four years,” Jess explained as we cruised down Grant Street through a golden October afternoon. “Then finally, this year, it all just came together in a beautiful way.”

Parklet in Franklinton

Jess, the project lead, and a very dedicated team of volunteers launched the Columbus Parklet Project outside Dirty Frank’s Hot Dog Palace on 4th and Cherry last summer for a 30-day trial. Parklets—sidewalk extensions providing more space plus amenities—help people understand that streets are more than byways from Point A to Point B. Streets are gathering places, Jess says, and using them as such makes for healthier, more vibrant cityscapes.

“That first parklet was a huge success,” Jess tells me as we straddle our bikes curbside in front of Dirty Frank’s, where the parklet once stood. On its heels, The Columbus Parklet Project installed a second, permanent parklet in Franklinton during this summer’s Urban Scrawl festival. A third parklet, hopefully permanent, will go in front of Café Brioso on Gay Street in Spring 2016. Jess explains all this as rush hour traffic whips by to our left and my stomach churns. But Jess believes that streets should feel safe for riders and pedestrians alike. We stay put.

This is one of the most fascinating aspects of Jess’ activism: it’s doggedly honor-bound, her convictions stronger than Everclear. Jess Mathews rides in whatever clothing to prove women don’t need special “gear” to get on a bike. She takes whichever street to prove there’s no need to feel cowed by the presence of cars. Interestingly, Jess rarely wears a helmet, so strong is her belief that city streets should be safe enough to ride without them. “All ages, all wages, all stages,” Jess says, a mantra for who should feel comfortable on a bike, and who streetscapes should be designed to serve.

Open Streets Yoga
Which brings me to the other big project with Jess at the helm: Open Streets Columbus. Open Streets is a national movement that shuts down stretches of city street for a day. People—on bikes, blades, and two feet—have the run of the asphalt, at least for awhile. “It can transform cities,” Jess says, “it’s an incredible petri dish that can get people reengaged with their cities, using streets the way they should be used.”

The first Open Streets Columbus happened Sept 13th on Rich Street downtown. The second followed the next weekend on a section of 4th between Main and Broad. Among other carless wonders, the Open Street events featured PoYo (pop-up yoga), a human-sized Scrabble game, and some impressive bike dancing. Jess and her team have a third Open Streets in the works for the same 4th Street location in 2016, with a possibility of adding a second event if funding comes through.

IMG_7439I wasn’t in town to see either Open Streets, but I did make it to this October’s 2 Wheels & Heels ladies bike night. Jess plans and leads these rides the last Wednesday of every month to get women hooked on freedom machines.

Because some serious rain had eased up just hours before this month’s ride, this 2 Wheels & Heels was intimate, only six women. But that was OK. The ride fell on the cusp of Halloween, and we were a band of witchy, bike-straddling, suffragette superheroes Two women showed up in onesies (ok, one was me, in leopard print). In solidarity with the ride’s namesake, the other onesie woman, an astronaut in an orange jumpsuit with pink hair, rocked a pair of black heels.

For this ride, Jess planned a six-miler dedicated to testing some newly installed infrastructure—a series of two-stage left turns along Spring Street, and the new bike lane on the notoriously busy/scary/bike-unfriendly 4th St corridor, a route Jess irritably called “a f-ing joke.”

Jess is passionate, but she burns a quiet fire. “How did that feel?” she asked the group after we’d ridden each new piece of infrastructure. The women agreed: we were glad to have a chance to ride these new facilities with a guide. That way, we actually understood how to use what was meant for us, especially those somewhat abstruse but very helpful two-stage lefts. As we spoke, Jess listened quietly, intently.

Larry Smith, famous six-word memoirist and TEDxColumbus alum, loves Jess’ fervor. “Jess is great at what she does because she’s 100% convinced her ideas are gonna work. Her total faith is what makes her stuff happen.”

Although 2 Wheels, the parklets, and Open Streets are up and spinning, they still require buckets of sweat equity—a whole bunch of hustling, organizing, coordinating, volunteering, recruiting, speaking out, showing up, and riding, riding, riding.

As Jess told me outside Dirty Frank’s, “I know people will get behind this once they see all it implemented later on down the road.”

Or, more aptly, the street.

Alessandra Wollner is a third year MFA candidate in creative nonfiction at OSU.

 

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Follow This, Speakers, TEDxColumbus

An end to paralysisby Rashmi Nemade

Scientific discovery goes in spurts. There is a period of time when progress is slow and incremental, and then, in a sudden burst, an innovation or revelation changes everything. Which then sets the stage for the next cycle of slow and incremental progress.

The slow and incremental is critical for progress in general. For example, many were working on the invention of artificial light, making progress bit-by-bit, day-by-day, when all of the sudden, Thomas Edison’s light bulb changed humanity forever. We’ve since been making more incremental progress in artificial light, but nothing yet as transformative as the light bulb.

And so we plug along, recognizing that there are all kinds of problems in the world, but not always able to solve them to the point of having a massive impact on humanity. However, there is a sudden burst of discovery happening right now. It’s called Neurobridge Technology, and it’s the ‘light bulb’ of neuroprosthetics.

A fusing of neuroscience and biomedical engineering, the field of neuroprosthetics interfaces the brain and a computer rather than a prosthetic and a limb. To explain: a standard prosthetic connects onto, say, an arm to give function to a hand. In neuroprosthetics, the brain is connected to a computer, which then is used to give function to, say, a wheelchair.

But Neurobridge technology does not just give function to a wheelchair, it gives function to a person’s own body. It empowers paralyzed patients to regain conscious control of their fingers, hands, wrists and arms. Those of us attending TEDxColumbus witnessed this process as we watched 23-year-old Ian Burkhart, paralyzed as a teenager, grasp a mug with his own hand and take a sip.

 

Bouton and Burkhart
Maybe like you, I was amazed to see a quadriplegic man pick up a mug, not with a prosthetic or a machine, but with his own hand controlled by his own thoughts. I needed to know more, so I reached out to Chad Bouton. He is the inventor of Neurobridge. He works at the Battelle Memorial Institute and is the speaker who shared his innovation at TEDxColumbus. He is also just about as modest as they come. As he talks about his revolutionary Neurobridge work, in the same breath, he cites the work of others before him, appreciates the privilege of working with experts, and is grateful for the tremendous resources at Battelle.

He is also grateful, appreciative and privileged to work with Ian Burkhart, who volunteered to help develop this technology and willingly endured hours of testing, surgery, and even more testing. Burkhart is now the first person ever to move a paralyzed limb with his own thoughts. “Ian is an incredibly hard-working, committed and persistent young man. He has a positive outlook and is excited to be a part of developing a technology that can help others,” says Bouton.

So how does this technology work? Neurobridge bypasses damaged areas of the spinal cord so the brain can communicate directly with muscles. The system combines a computer chip implanted in the brain, a brain-computer interface, and a sleeve that transmits electrical signals to the patient’s forearm and hand. You’ve heard of a heart bypass, well this is a neural “bypass,” taking signals from the brain, rerouting them around the damaged spinal cord and sending them directly to the muscles.

That’s the basic idea. But to actually make this happen, it takes an extraordinary and collaborative effort. Bouton had good reason to believe that his inventive idea would work, but proving that this technology could actually help people was essential. Bouton and a team within Battelle, along with doctors at the Ohio State University Wexner Medical Center, worked on decoding thoughts of movement, the implantation of a microchip by neurosurgery, the electronic sleeve, and the rehabilitation it would take to make this system workable. At the same time, Burkhart began using electrical stimulation to activate and build-up his atrophied forearm muscles, getting them ready to move again—at his command.

Burkhart also underwent tests with functional Magnetic Resonance Imaging (fMRI). Shown images of hand motions, he was asked to think about each motion. His thoughts were, in a sense, ‘read’ by the fMRI and translated into computer code. This is the code that would allow an implanted computer to read his thoughts and tell the sleeve on his arm what to do.

During a delicate three-hour surgery, neurosurgeons placed a pea-sized Neurobridge computer chip in Burkhart’s motor cortex. A port was created on his skull, so that a cable could be connected to interface with a computer. The Neurobridge chip reads his electrical brain signals, then sends them to the computer that recodes them and sends them to the sleeve he wears on his arm. The sleeve, with 200 electrodes that stimulate various muscle nerves and fibers, then signals his hand to move. All of this happens in less than a 10th of a second.

“It still takes Ian a remarkable amount of concentration to move, but he’s getting better at it every day,” says Bouton. In addition, when we move, we also have feedback from our moving body parts. But for Burkhart, the communication is one-way. His hand cannot tell his brain that the glass is grasped or say anything about its temperature. Burkhart must use his eyes to confirm that his arm is doing what he has told his arm to do.

Bouton envisions a future where mobile devices will allow patients to be connected to a much smaller computer, so that they will be more mobile. For now, Ian is helping to fine tune the Neurobridge system. He works with the sleeve, challenging his muscles and the machinery. Together, he and the team figure out if the system needs more electrodes and where in order to get better movement. The Neurobridge team is now looking forward to helping four more patients in this way. A clinical trial is underway. The expectation is that this technology can help people who suffer from any number of neurodegenerative diseases that affect nerve cells in the brain and the spinal cord, whether paralysis, stroke injuries, or Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS).

Other technology has used computers or robotics to move muscles. Neurobridge technology uses a computer as a conveyer of information, but it is the mind that is controlling and instigating the muscle movement. This is groundbreaking. It is game changing. It has never been done before and should be a springboard in the field of neuroprosthetics, launching the next set of advances.

Rashmi Nemade is principal at BioMedText, Inc.

how neurobridge works

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Follow This, Speakers, TEDxColumbus

Frederick Nadbaramiyeby Kendra Hovey

I read Frederick Ndabaramiye’s new memoir so that I could write about it for Follow This. I didn’t have to think about whether I wanted to read it. But you will. And because Frederick is Rwandan, and was just 11 years old when genocide swept through his country, you might wonder if this book will be too hard to read, or you might decide, no matter, it is still a book that you ought to read.

Frederick and Hanna

But while the reality of humanity’s capacity for cruelty is extremely hard, this book is not, and while bearing witness to the suffering of others is noble, don’t let it cloud your understanding of what this book is really about. It’s right there on the cover: Frederick. As Jack Hanna tells us in the foreword, “Today, you become one of the privileged. Today, you meet Frederick.”

Frederick: A Story of Boundless Hope,  written with Nashville author Amy Parker, was published this fall. In 2012, Frederick was a speaker at TEDxColumbus. In an onstage conversation with Nancy Kramer, he shared his story, including what he experienced at age 15, while traveling by bus in northeastern Rwanda. The 100-day genocide that left one million dead  had officially ended, but the Interahamwe genocidaires that had managed to escape capture, were again leading attacks from hideaways within the mountains of neighboring Congo. It was this group that intercepted Frederick’s bus and singling out Frederick, ordered him to kill everyone. He refused: “My God won’t let me do that.”

The Interahamwe massacred his bus companions and then severed Frederick’s arms below the elbow. While his book confronts the full force of this trauma—and shares it with equanimity and respect for the reader’s emotions—this memoir is not so much about what happened to Frederick; it’s about what Frederick makes happen.

The story opens with Frederick in Columbus, Ohio and absolutely reeling from so many firsts—his first experience with cities, planes, trains, thousands of white faces, the taste of ice cream and, ironically, gorillas. Frederick had never seen the mountain gorillas on the other side of his country—something “it seemed only wealthy Rwandans and international tourists were privy to”—yet gorillas are why he is here. It was through the Columbus Zoo’s conservation efforts in Rwanda that Frederick came to meet and eventually befriend Jack Hanna, Charlene Jendry and others, and from this, came the flight to Columbus and the appointment at Hanger Prosthetics where he was to be fit with mechanical fingers.

hanger prosthetics

Frederick’s story then takes us to Rwanda, to his village and family, the beginning of the genocide and to the fateful bus trip, and his unlikely escape. The blood streaming from what it left of his arms, he was forced to his feet and to walk. Frederick heard the order “Finish him off,” yet he kept walking “down the hill and into the trees and no one followed.” But escape did not mean survival, to survive would take something else: good fortune. There were the two sisters who first saved him and the truck full of men who found a surgeon; even the electrical cords the Interahamwe used to bind him saved his life. They acted as a tourniquet so that, as Frederick writes, “what those men had meant to harm me, God had used for good.”

I Am AbleThe gratitude expressed in these words from Frederick was hard won. Initially, there was only despair, an attempt to end his life and despair that, even at this, he was a failure. He was a burden, worth nothing, he thought, in a family and a country that demanded self-reliance. From the words in psalms and hymns he began to understand he was not alone in his suffering, and had the seed of a thought that would only grow: So sure of his uselessness, yet maybe there is another perspective he had not considered.

From this epiphany and all that he has made happen since—from a painting to a new educational center for people with disabilities to a movement “I Am Able”—there is a rich story, including surprising interactions with his perpetrator, with his savior and with his mother, that stun, yet reveal the quality of equanimity so impressive in him. There are unexpected details, like that, because rebels would cut the arms off of their own soldiers, Frederick could be mistakenly identified as the very people that did this to him, or that the Center he built and that now educates 500 from preschoolers to master’s students began with a volleyball game. Frederick was the coach.

Ubumwe Community Center

Wherever Frederick shares his story, people often respond with a kind of awed incomprehension. How has he not only healed from this, but thrived? And how did he find the magnanimity to forgive? His book answers these questions, but also asks us to see that his trauma is not so unique, nor is it so worse than others:

“When you, get down to it, I think we all have our handicaps. People everywhere struggle with forgiveness, and everyone is hungry for hope . . . By wearing my handicap on the outside, I’ve learned to speak about the trauma and the struggles that go along with it. People are more likely to show compassion to me. But what about those with hidden handicaps? Disability of the spirit is so much more debilitating than a physical disability. Yet we tend to be less sensitive to those hidden handicaps.”

“We are all broken,” he says. From everything he has experienced, the truth of this statement is clear to him. But, says Frederick, “the good thing is this: although we are all broken, we all have the same offer to be made whole again.”

Frederick at TEDxCbus

 

Kendra Hovey is editor at TEDxColumbus: Follow This. On Twitter @KendraHovey, she blogs at kendrahovey.com

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As you prepare for Friday’s TEDxColumbus: STEAM at the Capitol Theater, 77 South High Street, here are some specifics you will need to make it a spectacular day.

11:30 am – Registration Opens (pre-registration encouraged – see below)

Noon – Lunch

12:45 pm – Doors Open to Capitol Theater

1:00 pm – Program Begins

1:00 pm – 5:30 pm Three sessions of speakers and two breaks

5:30 pm – Program Ends, Happy Hour!

Our hashtag is #tedxcbus.

Registration

We are encouraging everyone who has purchased a ticket to pre-register by filling out this form with your name and email. Because CAPA/Ticketmaster could only capture the “purchaser” names – we don’t have everyone’s participants names. If you don’t pre-register, it’s okay, we can take care of you when you arrive. (If you have purchased for a group, you may send us a list to tedxcolumbus@gmail.com). DEADLINE for pre-registration is Wednesday at 6pm.

If you don’t pre-register, not to worry, we can register you at the door (just please be patient).

Where to park. 

Please consider using COTA, Car2Go or CoGo first!

If you are driving, we encourage parking at Columbus Commons. Everything within immediate proximity to the Riffe Center will be full.

How to arrive.

1. Curious and open. The speakers are coming prepared to provoke, it is your role to let them!

2. Willing to meet a stranger – or two. And have some amazing conversations.

3. By noon for lunch.  (Options for all dietary types and preferences – Vegan, GF, Carnivore). If you don’t want to have lunch, make sure to arrive by 12:45pm when the doors open for seating. All seats are general admission. We will begin very promptly at 1pm.

4. In comfortable clothes (seriously, jeans are encouraged).

5. With a creative name tag!  Of course we’ll have name tags for everyone – but judges will be roaming the breaks looking for creative expressions that you made with your own hands – and awarding drink tickets for ones they love.  (Check out the 2011 archive for inspiration). It is an awesome way to spark conversation, trust us.

If you want some reading preparation.

Take a look at the speakers’ profiles. It will help you understand their license to share their ideas. If you have seen a TED / TEDx talk, you know there isn’t any reviewing of biographies inside a talk – and we don’t do it in their live introductions either.

If you want to read more about the TEDx experience, here are some TEDxColumbus Follow This blog posts about who you might meet, why people came last year (with event reflections) and if this is your first time, some history on the origin of the event.

If you know someone that wanted to attend but can’t since we are sold out.

Please encourage them to attend the free Livestream viewing event at McConnell Arts Center in Worthington. No registration is necessary.

What you can do after TEDxColumbus. 

On Saturday, November 8th from 9am – noon, tune into TEDxYouth@Columbus. This partner event will be live streamed from COSI featuring ideas worth spreading from local High School speakers.

We will send you a link to a very important evaluation. Please take the 5 minutes to fill it out and be totally honest.  Many of the changes we made to this year’s event came from those evals last year.

The talks should be posted by Thanksgiving (no promises, but that’s our goal). We encourage you to share those ideas that provoked you.

All of the photos from the day will be posted to our Flickr account, which also is an archive of the past five year’s events.

If you want to be involved in any future TEDxColumbus or TEDxColumbusWomen planning, please email us tedxcolumbus@gmail.com.

And we love to partner with other TEDx programs at schools, universities, corporations and of course, prisons! The more good ideas we can spread, the better.

See you Friday! As always, let us know if you have questions – tedxcolumbus@gmail.com.

TEDxColumbus Organizing Team

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