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TEDTalks, TEDxColumbus

TEDxColumbus Event Organizer Meagan Buren appeared on the 610 WTVN-AM morning show to talk all-things TEDxColumbus. In her interview with host Matt McCoy, Meagan shared insights on topics like:

– What exactly is TEDxColumbus

– What the theme SPARK signifies

– What we can expect to hear from the 2019 speakers

– What the is process for selecting speakers

– Which past TEDxColumbus speakers stand out to Meagan

– Where you can find the archive of TEDxColumbus videos

Listen to the interview here:

TEDxColumbus 2019: SPARK will take place Friday, November 15. Tickets will go on sale in early September. Watch our site and social media channels for details.

With gratitude to The Columbus Foundation, Kramer-Celeste Family Fund, IBMix, LBrands Foundation, The Ohio State University, Safelite AutoGlass, Kaufman Development, Crane Group, Crimson Cup, WOSU Public Media, Bonfire Red, Fort, and FALKtography for their generous partnerships in helping to underwrite TEDxColumbus.  

We’d love to have your organization be a part of TEDxColumbus, too. Interested sponsors can email us at tedxcolumbus@gmail.com to learn about our opportunities.

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TEDTalks, TEDxColumbus

Year 11.

Last week we announced our 11th year of speakers for TEDxColumbus.  I’ve transitioned to become a member of the curatorial committee, after 10 years of chairing and facilitating it.

It reminded me of the values on which TEDx was formed and how they’ve helped to translate and ground us in our own coaching and training practice. It’s always good to revisit those values, and I hope by doing so, they will help others build what I call resilient storytelling cultures.

 

A. Democratization of ideas.

 

Creating one stage, one audience, one set of speakers is how TED started and continues to do it. No breakouts, no hierarchy or one speaker better than another. Sure, some may get more time to explain a more complex idea, but otherwise the ideas are truly treated equal.

 

B.  The idea matters first, then the person.

 

When we curate a TEDx event or a TED-like event inside a company or organization, we care most about the idea and will it provoke the audience, bring them new thinking, draw out a bias or inspire them to new action. While the person delivering the talk is very important, it is the ideas we choose first.

 

C. An idea is not worth spreading just because you experienced it.

 

It is worth spreading because it applies to a larger audience than yourself when others can benefit and relate.

 

Undoubtedly, the hardest talks to pick are those in the “personal story” category. Since we limit the number of personal talks (against those in technology, design, medicine, science, research, engineering, social change, etc), the more compelling stories will always tip the scales. Remember the other two (general) categories are ownership of Intellectual Property and front-row trend watcher.

 

D. Ideas come on a spectrum of maturity.

 

Some are still nuggets in your brain, some others are built out but not yet proven fully, and some have insights and reflections based in truths that are undeniable. Largely, TEDx talks are looking for the last category. Talks that project an idea still in the rumination phase usually are not received well by audiences.

 

E. Whenever someone is chosen for a talk, there is a lot of work that goes into taking the idea and expressing it through a great talk.

 

We have found repeatedly that what someone invests in time, practice, iteration and delivery will return in spades. The value of accountability is super strong in the process of preparing a talk – and we are known for building accountable schedules that almost guarantee you’ll deliver a great talk no matter the event or audience.

 

Ruth Milligan is co-organizer of TEDxColumbus. Since 2009, Ruth has selected and coached over 200 speakers who have taken the TEDxColumbus stage.

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As you prepare for Friday’s TEDxColumbus: STEAM at the Capitol Theater, 77 South High Street, here are some specifics you will need to make it a spectacular day.

11:30 am – Registration Opens (pre-registration encouraged – see below)

Noon – Lunch

12:45 pm – Doors Open to Capitol Theater

1:00 pm – Program Begins

1:00 pm – 5:30 pm Three sessions of speakers and two breaks

5:30 pm – Program Ends, Happy Hour!

Our hashtag is #tedxcbus.

Registration

We are encouraging everyone who has purchased a ticket to pre-register by filling out this form with your name and email. Because CAPA/Ticketmaster could only capture the “purchaser” names – we don’t have everyone’s participants names. If you don’t pre-register, it’s okay, we can take care of you when you arrive. (If you have purchased for a group, you may send us a list to tedxcolumbus@gmail.com). DEADLINE for pre-registration is Wednesday at 6pm.

If you don’t pre-register, not to worry, we can register you at the door (just please be patient).

Where to park. 

Please consider using COTA, Car2Go or CoGo first!

If you are driving, we encourage parking at Columbus Commons. Everything within immediate proximity to the Riffe Center will be full.

How to arrive.

1. Curious and open. The speakers are coming prepared to provoke, it is your role to let them!

2. Willing to meet a stranger – or two. And have some amazing conversations.

3. By noon for lunch.  (Options for all dietary types and preferences – Vegan, GF, Carnivore). If you don’t want to have lunch, make sure to arrive by 12:45pm when the doors open for seating. All seats are general admission. We will begin very promptly at 1pm.

4. In comfortable clothes (seriously, jeans are encouraged).

5. With a creative name tag!  Of course we’ll have name tags for everyone – but judges will be roaming the breaks looking for creative expressions that you made with your own hands – and awarding drink tickets for ones they love.  (Check out the 2011 archive for inspiration). It is an awesome way to spark conversation, trust us.

If you want some reading preparation.

Take a look at the speakers’ profiles. It will help you understand their license to share their ideas. If you have seen a TED / TEDx talk, you know there isn’t any reviewing of biographies inside a talk – and we don’t do it in their live introductions either.

If you want to read more about the TEDx experience, here are some TEDxColumbus Follow This blog posts about who you might meet, why people came last year (with event reflections) and if this is your first time, some history on the origin of the event.

If you know someone that wanted to attend but can’t since we are sold out.

Please encourage them to attend the free Livestream viewing event at McConnell Arts Center in Worthington. No registration is necessary.

What you can do after TEDxColumbus. 

On Saturday, November 8th from 9am – noon, tune into TEDxYouth@Columbus. This partner event will be live streamed from COSI featuring ideas worth spreading from local High School speakers.

We will send you a link to a very important evaluation. Please take the 5 minutes to fill it out and be totally honest.  Many of the changes we made to this year’s event came from those evals last year.

The talks should be posted by Thanksgiving (no promises, but that’s our goal). We encourage you to share those ideas that provoked you.

All of the photos from the day will be posted to our Flickr account, which also is an archive of the past five year’s events.

If you want to be involved in any future TEDxColumbus or TEDxColumbusWomen planning, please email us tedxcolumbus@gmail.com.

And we love to partner with other TEDx programs at schools, universities, corporations and of course, prisons! The more good ideas we can spread, the better.

See you Friday! As always, let us know if you have questions – tedxcolumbus@gmail.com.

TEDxColumbus Organizing Team

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We’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you, for our Friday Favorites blog series.

This week, Chrystie Hill (full bio below) TEDxColumbus 2009 speaker shares her favorite talks.

 

1. Will Hewett: Singing yourself Alive

 

2. Sheryl Sandberg: Why we have too few women leaders

 

3. William Kamkwamba: How I harnessed the wind

 

4. Larry Lessig: Laws that choke creativity

 

5. Lisa Kristine: Photos that bear witness to modern slavery

 

Chrystie Hill is a librarian, writer, and community builder. After a short stint at the Seattle Public Library, she started It Girl Consulting, a small venture that helps libraries use online tools to build communities online. In 2003, Chrystie joined OCLC where she serves as the Director of Community Services for WebJunction. Chrystie is a frequent presenter at library meetings and conferences, and her articles have appeared in JASIST, Library Journal, American Libraries, and RUSQ. In 2007, Chrystie was nominated as a Library Journal Mover and Shaker and Inside, Outside, and Online: building your library community was published by ALA Editions in 2009. Chrystie’s undergraduate degree is in Biology and Psychology, she holds a Master of Arts in History from Sarah Lawrence College, and her MLIS is from the University of Washington, Seattle. Chrystie was a 2009 TEDxColumbus speaker.

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We’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you, for our Friday Favorites blog series.

This week, Matthew Dyer (full bio below) TEDxColumbus enthusiast shares his favorite talks.

1. Nancy Duarte: The secret structure of great talks

 

2. Barry Schwartz: Our loss of wisdom

 

3. Eric Whitacre: A virtual choir 2,000 voices strong

 

4. Evelyn Glennie: How to truly listen

 

5. Susan Willeke: The good side of bias

 

Matthew R. Dyer has over 12 years of Human Resources experience and joined the State of Ohio in 2005. He has served in various HR capacities for different state agencies, including the Ohio Housing Finance Agency, which awarded him 2007 Employee of the Year.

Matthew holds dual Bachelor degrees and is a graduate of United Way of Central Ohio’s Pride Leadership Cycle 5. He is a Columbus Gay Men’s Chorus board member at-large, President-Elect of the State of Ohio Training Association, and his creativity earned him 4th place in an international presentation design contest.

Matthew currently serves as Head, Employee Services at the State Library of Ohio. Not generally recognized for being prompt, Matthew is often reminded that he may be a Head, but he’s usually 15 minutes behind.

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We’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you, for our Friday Favorites blog series.

This week, Randy Nelson (full bio below) TEDxColumbus 2011 speaker shares his favorite talks.

1. Theresa Flores: Find a Voice with Soap

 

2. Claudia Kirsch: Hitchhikers Beware

 

3. Jessica Hagy: So you think you are interesting?

 

4. Gary Wenk: Long life depends on this

 

5. The Salty Caramels: Live performance

 

Randy J. Nelson is Professor and Chair of the Department of Neuroscience at The Ohio State University Medical Center. He holds the Dr. John D. and E. Olive Brumbaugh Chair in Brain Research and Teaching.  Dr. Nelson also holds joint appointments as Professor of Psychology and Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology. OSU. Nelson earned his AB and MA degrees in Psychology in at the University of California at Berkeley. He earned a PhD in Psychology, as well as a second PhD in Endocrinology simultaneously from the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Nelson then completed a postdoctoral fellowship in reproductive physiology at the University of Texas at Austin.

Nelson served on the faculty at The Johns Hopkins University from 1986 until 2000 where he was Professor of Psychology, Neuroscience, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. He joined the faculty at OSU in the fall of 2000.

Nelson has published over 300 research articles and several books describing studies in seasonality, behavioral endocrinology, biological rhythms, stress, immune function, sex behavior, and aggressive behavior. His current studies examine the effects of light at night on metabolism, mood, inflammation, and behavior.

Nelson has been continuously funded since 1984.  He has been elected to Fellow status in several scientific associations including the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Psychological Association, Association for Psychological Science, and the Animal Behavior Society. Nelson has served on many federal grant panels and currently serves on the editorial boards of six scientific journals.  He was awarded the Distinguished Scholar Award at OSU in 2006, as well as the University Distinguished Lecturer, and the OSU Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching in 2009. Nelson was a 2011 TEDxColumbus speaker.

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[by Kendra Hovey]

What does it really take to be ready for the TEDx stage? For Rich Bowers this is both a practical question useful to those with TED/TEDx ambitions, and a philosophical one: how is it that we create ideas, then shape, scale, and share them?

The question so intrigued the videographer and TEDster (once upon a time—as in pre-Chris Anderson—Bowers even attended TED), he set out to document it. For three months last year he followed TEDxColumbus speakers Jan Allen and Naomi Stanford on their journey to the TEDx stage. The result is his new documentary, “The Talk Emerges.”

The video is a labor of love. Bowers tends to devote himself to one of these almost every year, somehow finding the time while also operating a design and production company. Though many of his previous independent projects focus on musicians, they all share a similar fascination with the creative process:

“Humans can make things up out of nothing,” he says. “A lot of it is crap, but some of it is good. Humans have also figured out how to edit—to pick the good from the crap.”

And all Bowers wants to know is: “How does all that happen?”

“The Talk Emerges,” then, is one more opportunity, as he says, “to look deep into the pool where things originate . . . and perhaps watch something good come out of it.”

It is also, Bowers hopes, a tool for potential speakers and one that will put some substance behind the oft-heard, but abstract description: it’s a lot of work. He hopes, too, that those who enjoy TED and TEDx will appreciate even more the care and craftsmanship behind the experience they have come to love.

In “The Talk Emerges,” Bowers devotes much of his running time (70 mins.) to interviews, as each speaker shapes her idea and performance, and truly digests the impact of the TED requirements. “I cannot emphasize enough how gutsy Jan and Naomi were to do this,” he says, adding, “their willingness to share the good ideas, the missteps, the angst, the fun, and their own personal growth is a huge contribution to the TEDx tradition.”

So, after 40 hours of prep, research, and filming, plus weeks of editing, what wisdom about creating a successful TED talk can Rich Bowers now share?

  • First, take the challenge seriously, he says. A TED Talk is a commitment.
  • Second, in the best talks, the speaker is immersed in the subject. Not just cares, emphasizes Bowers, but is invested: “Be sure you have that kind of investment.”
  • Third, you will surprise yourself, he says, and there will be “good surprises and less good surprises.” In other words, embrace candor.

And, to have the best time, he suggests, “absorb the mechanics.” For the time being, make it part of your persona, he says, “then enjoy yourself and enjoy sharing your important idea with an audience.”

Kendra Hovey is editor and head writer at Follow This. On Twitter @KendraHovey, she blogs at kendrahovey.com

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We’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you, for our Friday Favorites blog series.

This week, Janice Rapp a TEDxColumbus enthusiast shares her favorite talks.

1. Suzanne Beachy: What’s next for the truth

 

2. Megan Jones: Making history

 

3. Theresa Flores: Find a voice with soap

 

4. David Burns: Heartache of education

 

5. Frederick Ndabaramiye:A brighter future than past

 

 

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We’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you, for our Friday Favorites blog series.

This week, Phil Cogley AKA “The Saturday Giant” (full bio below) TEDxColumbus 2010 performer shares his favorite talks.

1. Eric Whitacre: A virtual choir 2,000 voices strong

2. Suzanne Beachy: What’s next for truth?

3. Matt Slaybaugh: Finally, this is for you

4. Hans Rosling: Global population growth, box by box

5. Michael Wilkos: Surprise, it’s Columbus 2.0!

 

After a period of experimentation with a variety of recording techniques and instrumentation, and amidst a one year sojourn in Pittsburgh, Cogley set to work writing and recording his debut effort, a concept album titled You’ve Heard of Dragons. The Album posits the hypothetical scenario of world domination by malevolent reptilian humaniods (say that three times fast!) as a way of grappling with war, natural disasters, and the end of the world. Phil was a 2010 TEDxColumbus performer.

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We’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you, for our Friday Favorites blog series.

This week, Maryanna Klatt (full bio below) TEDxColumbus 2011 speaker shares her favorite talks.

1. Paul Zak: Trust, morality — and oxytocin?

 

2. Terri Wahl: Minding your Mitochondria

 

3. Brené Brown: Listening to shame

 

4. Atul Gawande: How do we heal medicine?

 

5. Dr. Mimi Guarneri: Shifting the Healthcare Paradigm

 

Maryanna Klatt, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor, in the College of Medicine at Ohio State University, teaching undergraduates, graduate students, medical students, and Family Medicine Residents. The focus of her teaching, research and practice is Integrative Medicine, which is the practice of medicine that reaffirms the importance of the relationship between practitioner and patient, focuses on the whole person, is informed by scientific evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches to achieve optimal health and healing. She created and directs an interdisciplinary minor at OSU, Integrative Approaches to Health and Wellness. Her students are the health care providers of tomorrow and she is energized by their commitment to understanding the whole person of the patient. Teaching has been a source of joy in her life.

Dr. Klatt’s research focus has been to develop and evaluate feasible, cost-effective ways to reduce the risk of stress-related chronic illness, for both adults and children. Trained in Mindfulness and a certified yoga instructor through Yoga Alliance, she combines these two approaches in a unique approach to stress prevention/reduction. Her adult Mindfulness-Based Intervention, Mindfulness in Motion, is delivered at the worksite, while the program for children, Fuel for Learning is a classroom based intervention. Both programs combine yoga, mindfulness, and relaxing music, yielding stress reduction, increased quality of sleep, and improvements in problem behavior often related to stress in children. She has published several articles and book chapters, and has presented her work at national and international scientific conferences. Dr. Klatt believes that we can get more out of life by slowing down, reorienting each day to what is most essential in life. Mindfulness is the art of being present for one’s life- and all it has to offer. It is a self regulatory skill that can be learned. Mindfulness teaches people how to become aware of their thoughts, feelings, and body, without judgment. It exposes stress as the result of our response to life events (big and small) and places stress reduction within the individual- the most local of levels. Dr. Klatt believes that there is an unexplored mine of low cost, high yield movement and meditation practices that have broad pragmatic value. Her goal is to expose people to mindfulness, yoga, and breathing techniques that can be done during the day, in the environment in which they spend their day, helping them achieve the life and balance that they desire.

Maryanna and her husband Bill, an Appellate Judge on the 10th District Court of Appeals, have three grown children, Will (25), Anna (22), and Joseph (19) who are the best mindfulness teachers one could ever imagine. They are each passionate about life and want to leave the world a better place than they found it. Having a healthy marriage and parenting their children in tandem, have been the central foci of Maryanna and Bill’s personal and professional journeys, taken together. This is the central joy of her life. Maryanna was a 2011 TEDxColumbus Speaker

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