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As you prepare for Friday’s TEDxColumbus: STEAM at the Capitol Theater, 77 South High Street, here are some specifics you will need to make it a spectacular day.

11:30 am – Registration Opens (pre-registration encouraged – see below)

Noon – Lunch

12:45 pm – Doors Open to Capitol Theater

1:00 pm – Program Begins

1:00 pm – 5:30 pm Three sessions of speakers and two breaks

5:30 pm – Program Ends, Happy Hour!

Our hashtag is #tedxcbus.

Registration

We are encouraging everyone who has purchased a ticket to pre-register by filling out this form with your name and email. Because CAPA/Ticketmaster could only capture the “purchaser” names – we don’t have everyone’s participants names. If you don’t pre-register, it’s okay, we can take care of you when you arrive. (If you have purchased for a group, you may send us a list to tedxcolumbus@gmail.com). DEADLINE for pre-registration is Wednesday at 6pm.

If you don’t pre-register, not to worry, we can register you at the door (just please be patient).

Where to park. 

Please consider using COTA, Car2Go or CoGo first!

If you are driving, we encourage parking at Columbus Commons. Everything within immediate proximity to the Riffe Center will be full.

How to arrive.

1. Curious and open. The speakers are coming prepared to provoke, it is your role to let them!

2. Willing to meet a stranger – or two. And have some amazing conversations.

3. By noon for lunch.  (Options for all dietary types and preferences – Vegan, GF, Carnivore). If you don’t want to have lunch, make sure to arrive by 12:45pm when the doors open for seating. All seats are general admission. We will begin very promptly at 1pm.

4. In comfortable clothes (seriously, jeans are encouraged).

5. With a creative name tag!  Of course we’ll have name tags for everyone – but judges will be roaming the breaks looking for creative expressions that you made with your own hands – and awarding drink tickets for ones they love.  (Check out the 2011 archive for inspiration). It is an awesome way to spark conversation, trust us.

If you want some reading preparation.

Take a look at the speakers’ profiles. It will help you understand their license to share their ideas. If you have seen a TED / TEDx talk, you know there isn’t any reviewing of biographies inside a talk – and we don’t do it in their live introductions either.

If you want to read more about the TEDx experience, here are some TEDxColumbus Follow This blog posts about who you might meet, why people came last year (with event reflections) and if this is your first time, some history on the origin of the event.

If you know someone that wanted to attend but can’t since we are sold out.

Please encourage them to attend the free Livestream viewing event at McConnell Arts Center in Worthington. No registration is necessary.

What you can do after TEDxColumbus. 

On Saturday, November 8th from 9am – noon, tune into TEDxYouth@Columbus. This partner event will be live streamed from COSI featuring ideas worth spreading from local High School speakers.

We will send you a link to a very important evaluation. Please take the 5 minutes to fill it out and be totally honest.  Many of the changes we made to this year’s event came from those evals last year.

The talks should be posted by Thanksgiving (no promises, but that’s our goal). We encourage you to share those ideas that provoked you.

All of the photos from the day will be posted to our Flickr account, which also is an archive of the past five year’s events.

If you want to be involved in any future TEDxColumbus or TEDxColumbusWomen planning, please email us tedxcolumbus@gmail.com.

And we love to partner with other TEDx programs at schools, universities, corporations and of course, prisons! The more good ideas we can spread, the better.

See you Friday! As always, let us know if you have questions – tedxcolumbus@gmail.com.

TEDxColumbus Organizing Team

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We’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you, for our Friday Favorites blog series.

This week, Chrystie Hill (full bio below) TEDxColumbus 2009 speaker shares her favorite talks.

 

1. Will Hewett: Singing yourself Alive

 

2. Sheryl Sandberg: Why we have too few women leaders

 

3. William Kamkwamba: How I harnessed the wind

 

4. Larry Lessig: Laws that choke creativity

 

5. Lisa Kristine: Photos that bear witness to modern slavery

 

Chrystie Hill is a librarian, writer, and community builder. After a short stint at the Seattle Public Library, she started It Girl Consulting, a small venture that helps libraries use online tools to build communities online. In 2003, Chrystie joined OCLC where she serves as the Director of Community Services for WebJunction. Chrystie is a frequent presenter at library meetings and conferences, and her articles have appeared in JASIST, Library Journal, American Libraries, and RUSQ. In 2007, Chrystie was nominated as a Library Journal Mover and Shaker and Inside, Outside, and Online: building your library community was published by ALA Editions in 2009. Chrystie’s undergraduate degree is in Biology and Psychology, she holds a Master of Arts in History from Sarah Lawrence College, and her MLIS is from the University of Washington, Seattle. Chrystie was a 2009 TEDxColumbus speaker.

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We’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you, for our Friday Favorites blog series.

This week, Matthew Dyer (full bio below) TEDxColumbus enthusiast shares his favorite talks.

1. Nancy Duarte: The secret structure of great talks

 

2. Barry Schwartz: Our loss of wisdom

 

3. Eric Whitacre: A virtual choir 2,000 voices strong

 

4. Evelyn Glennie: How to truly listen

 

5. Susan Willeke: The good side of bias

 

Matthew R. Dyer has over 12 years of Human Resources experience and joined the State of Ohio in 2005. He has served in various HR capacities for different state agencies, including the Ohio Housing Finance Agency, which awarded him 2007 Employee of the Year.

Matthew holds dual Bachelor degrees and is a graduate of United Way of Central Ohio’s Pride Leadership Cycle 5. He is a Columbus Gay Men’s Chorus board member at-large, President-Elect of the State of Ohio Training Association, and his creativity earned him 4th place in an international presentation design contest.

Matthew currently serves as Head, Employee Services at the State Library of Ohio. Not generally recognized for being prompt, Matthew is often reminded that he may be a Head, but he’s usually 15 minutes behind.

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We’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you, for our Friday Favorites blog series.

This week, Randy Nelson (full bio below) TEDxColumbus 2011 speaker shares his favorite talks.

1. Theresa Flores: Find a Voice with Soap

 

2. Claudia Kirsch: Hitchhikers Beware

 

3. Jessica Hagy: So you think you are interesting?

 

4. Gary Wenk: Long life depends on this

 

5. The Salty Caramels: Live performance

 

Randy J. Nelson is Professor and Chair of the Department of Neuroscience at The Ohio State University Medical Center. He holds the Dr. John D. and E. Olive Brumbaugh Chair in Brain Research and Teaching.  Dr. Nelson also holds joint appointments as Professor of Psychology and Evolution, Ecology, and Organismal Biology. OSU. Nelson earned his AB and MA degrees in Psychology in at the University of California at Berkeley. He earned a PhD in Psychology, as well as a second PhD in Endocrinology simultaneously from the University of California at Berkeley. Dr. Nelson then completed a postdoctoral fellowship in reproductive physiology at the University of Texas at Austin.

Nelson served on the faculty at The Johns Hopkins University from 1986 until 2000 where he was Professor of Psychology, Neuroscience, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. He joined the faculty at OSU in the fall of 2000.

Nelson has published over 300 research articles and several books describing studies in seasonality, behavioral endocrinology, biological rhythms, stress, immune function, sex behavior, and aggressive behavior. His current studies examine the effects of light at night on metabolism, mood, inflammation, and behavior.

Nelson has been continuously funded since 1984.  He has been elected to Fellow status in several scientific associations including the American Association for the Advancement of Science, American Psychological Association, Association for Psychological Science, and the Animal Behavior Society. Nelson has served on many federal grant panels and currently serves on the editorial boards of six scientific journals.  He was awarded the Distinguished Scholar Award at OSU in 2006, as well as the University Distinguished Lecturer, and the OSU Alumni Award for Distinguished Teaching in 2009. Nelson was a 2011 TEDxColumbus speaker.

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[by Kendra Hovey]

What does it really take to be ready for the TEDx stage? For Rich Bowers this is both a practical question useful to those with TED/TEDx ambitions, and a philosophical one: how is it that we create ideas, then shape, scale, and share them?

The question so intrigued the videographer and TEDster (once upon a time—as in pre-Chris Anderson—Bowers even attended TED), he set out to document it. For three months last year he followed TEDxColumbus speakers Jan Allen and Naomi Stanford on their journey to the TEDx stage. The result is his new documentary, “The Talk Emerges.”

The video is a labor of love. Bowers tends to devote himself to one of these almost every year, somehow finding the time while also operating a design and production company. Though many of his previous independent projects focus on musicians, they all share a similar fascination with the creative process:

“Humans can make things up out of nothing,” he says. “A lot of it is crap, but some of it is good. Humans have also figured out how to edit—to pick the good from the crap.”

And all Bowers wants to know is: “How does all that happen?”

“The Talk Emerges,” then, is one more opportunity, as he says, “to look deep into the pool where things originate . . . and perhaps watch something good come out of it.”

It is also, Bowers hopes, a tool for potential speakers and one that will put some substance behind the oft-heard, but abstract description: it’s a lot of work. He hopes, too, that those who enjoy TED and TEDx will appreciate even more the care and craftsmanship behind the experience they have come to love.

In “The Talk Emerges,” Bowers devotes much of his running time (70 mins.) to interviews, as each speaker shapes her idea and performance, and truly digests the impact of the TED requirements. “I cannot emphasize enough how gutsy Jan and Naomi were to do this,” he says, adding, “their willingness to share the good ideas, the missteps, the angst, the fun, and their own personal growth is a huge contribution to the TEDx tradition.”

So, after 40 hours of prep, research, and filming, plus weeks of editing, what wisdom about creating a successful TED talk can Rich Bowers now share?

  • First, take the challenge seriously, he says. A TED Talk is a commitment.
  • Second, in the best talks, the speaker is immersed in the subject. Not just cares, emphasizes Bowers, but is invested: “Be sure you have that kind of investment.”
  • Third, you will surprise yourself, he says, and there will be “good surprises and less good surprises.” In other words, embrace candor.

And, to have the best time, he suggests, “absorb the mechanics.” For the time being, make it part of your persona, he says, “then enjoy yourself and enjoy sharing your important idea with an audience.”

Kendra Hovey is editor and head writer at Follow This. On Twitter @KendraHovey, she blogs at kendrahovey.com

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We’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you, for our Friday Favorites blog series.

This week, Janice Rapp a TEDxColumbus enthusiast shares her favorite talks.

1. Suzanne Beachy: What’s next for the truth

 

2. Megan Jones: Making history

 

3. Theresa Flores: Find a voice with soap

 

4. David Burns: Heartache of education

 

5. Frederick Ndabaramiye:A brighter future than past

 

 

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We’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you, for our Friday Favorites blog series.

This week, Phil Cogley AKA “The Saturday Giant” (full bio below) TEDxColumbus 2010 performer shares his favorite talks.

1. Eric Whitacre: A virtual choir 2,000 voices strong

2. Suzanne Beachy: What’s next for truth?

3. Matt Slaybaugh: Finally, this is for you

4. Hans Rosling: Global population growth, box by box

5. Michael Wilkos: Surprise, it’s Columbus 2.0!

 

After a period of experimentation with a variety of recording techniques and instrumentation, and amidst a one year sojourn in Pittsburgh, Cogley set to work writing and recording his debut effort, a concept album titled You’ve Heard of Dragons. The Album posits the hypothetical scenario of world domination by malevolent reptilian humaniods (say that three times fast!) as a way of grappling with war, natural disasters, and the end of the world. Phil was a 2010 TEDxColumbus performer.

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We’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you, for our Friday Favorites blog series.

This week, Maryanna Klatt (full bio below) TEDxColumbus 2011 speaker shares her favorite talks.

1. Paul Zak: Trust, morality — and oxytocin?

 

2. Terri Wahl: Minding your Mitochondria

 

3. Brené Brown: Listening to shame

 

4. Atul Gawande: How do we heal medicine?

 

5. Dr. Mimi Guarneri: Shifting the Healthcare Paradigm

 

Maryanna Klatt, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor, in the College of Medicine at Ohio State University, teaching undergraduates, graduate students, medical students, and Family Medicine Residents. The focus of her teaching, research and practice is Integrative Medicine, which is the practice of medicine that reaffirms the importance of the relationship between practitioner and patient, focuses on the whole person, is informed by scientific evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches to achieve optimal health and healing. She created and directs an interdisciplinary minor at OSU, Integrative Approaches to Health and Wellness. Her students are the health care providers of tomorrow and she is energized by their commitment to understanding the whole person of the patient. Teaching has been a source of joy in her life.

Dr. Klatt’s research focus has been to develop and evaluate feasible, cost-effective ways to reduce the risk of stress-related chronic illness, for both adults and children. Trained in Mindfulness and a certified yoga instructor through Yoga Alliance, she combines these two approaches in a unique approach to stress prevention/reduction. Her adult Mindfulness-Based Intervention, Mindfulness in Motion, is delivered at the worksite, while the program for children, Fuel for Learning is a classroom based intervention. Both programs combine yoga, mindfulness, and relaxing music, yielding stress reduction, increased quality of sleep, and improvements in problem behavior often related to stress in children. She has published several articles and book chapters, and has presented her work at national and international scientific conferences. Dr. Klatt believes that we can get more out of life by slowing down, reorienting each day to what is most essential in life. Mindfulness is the art of being present for one’s life- and all it has to offer. It is a self regulatory skill that can be learned. Mindfulness teaches people how to become aware of their thoughts, feelings, and body, without judgment. It exposes stress as the result of our response to life events (big and small) and places stress reduction within the individual- the most local of levels. Dr. Klatt believes that there is an unexplored mine of low cost, high yield movement and meditation practices that have broad pragmatic value. Her goal is to expose people to mindfulness, yoga, and breathing techniques that can be done during the day, in the environment in which they spend their day, helping them achieve the life and balance that they desire.

Maryanna and her husband Bill, an Appellate Judge on the 10th District Court of Appeals, have three grown children, Will (25), Anna (22), and Joseph (19) who are the best mindfulness teachers one could ever imagine. They are each passionate about life and want to leave the world a better place than they found it. Having a healthy marriage and parenting their children in tandem, have been the central foci of Maryanna and Bill’s personal and professional journeys, taken together. This is the central joy of her life. Maryanna was a 2011 TEDxColumbus Speaker

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Events, Follow This, TEDTalks, TEDxColumbus, TEDxMarionCorrectional

The first ever TEDx in an adult prison held its second TEDx on April 21. To tell the story of this uncommon event we’ll hear, first, from our editor Kendra Hovey, attending TEDxMarionCorrectional for the first time. Second, pending approval of the institution, we’ll also hear from Marion inmates, both those involved and those attending. Kendra’s story begins below, but first, a few facts:

  • TEDxMarionCorrectional is hosted by the institution (medium security) and held within its walls.
  • It was founded by inmates Dan and Wayne, who also curate along with Jo Dee Davis (director of Healing Broken Circles ) and Jordan Edelheit (student and founder of TEDxOhioStateUniversity).
  • Both Dan and Wayne were introduced to TED while incarcerated at Marion Correctional Institution.   
  • The inaugural event, A Life Worth Living? (9.16.12), was highlighted at TED 2013 and on the TED blog.
  • The curators have been asked to consult on other prison events including the upcoming TEDxSanQuentin (9.20.13).
  • The audience at the second event, titled What’s Next?, was split down the middle: 149 inmates (chosen through an application process), 152 outsiders (registered after entering their name on a sign-up form). Outsiders were a mix. Our editor met a college student, a foundation president, a software guy and a yoga instructor. The event is also live streamed throughout the prison so the entire inmate population (approx: 2,500) has the option to watch.
  • Inmates are identified by first name only in accordance with rules guarding victims’ rights.
  • Any questions for inmates about the event can be left in comments. We will forward to Marion Correctional.


TEDxMarionCorrectional: From Outside In

by Kendra Hovey

The TED format stresses substance over status, yet the TED stage is status, making this meritocratic aspiration a bit harder to pull off. Nonetheless, I like the attempt and it’s why I purposely go into each event knowing as little about each speaker as possible. This should explain why I didn’t think about TEDxMarionCorrectional until the night before, and why even then it was only logistics (can I take in a pen? paper?) and cracking-wise (“last night before I go to prison tomorrow, honey”). But it doesn’t.

When I arrive at the prison the next morning I enter through a small building. With chairs in even rows, a wall of lockers, manned desk, security gate and waiting room, it feels vaguely like a rural airport. After locking up my stuff, I sign-in, get my nametag, complimentary gift—a pen—pass through security and then, with a group of about 20, I’m led across the courtyard into a larger building. Passing in and out of locked enclosures, we walk by the visiting room, a barbershop, small holding cells, a photo display of wardens, and eventually down a narrow hallway and through a set of double doors, spilling us into a large, open room humming with conversation.

I’m barely in when, to my right, an inmate welcomes me, followed by another and another. One says hello, another nods, more smile, many extend a hand; a greeting is followed by an exchange of names and we’re talking, and then that conversation blends into another conversation and another and, just like that, I’m engaged in the most seamless mingling between 300 strangers I have ever encountered.

At one point, Wayne interrupts. The co-founder and co-curator (with fellow inmate Dan) is at the mic to tell us what we are already doing: This is the casual meet-and-greet section of the day, he says. It will last one hour, and at 12:30 sharp the first session will begin. Rules. They are at least one thing TED and prison have in common.

Returning to our conversations, an inmate asks if I’d been inside a prison before. The answer is easy: no. Yet, my head fills with images of prisons, ones I’ve toured or explored, and prisons in movies and TV . . . but had I been in a prison with prisoners? No. But that didn’t stop me from believing I had.

Then he asks, “What were you thinking before you came in?” and I am stumped. Nothing. Because my mind is open, I’d like to say, but my mind is closed—lights out, door locked, closed-for-business closed. If I had let myself think, I realize just then, I might not be here.

TEDxMarionCorrectional is on a Sunday, it’s an hour away, it’s all-day, and when you’re in, you’re in; no coming and going, no cell phones (good lord!), and no outside food. With so many easy-outs, even a standard issue fear of the unknown could make me chicken-out, let alone all the assumptions that this man’s question just let loose. If I had let myself think, would I have been fearful? Apprehensive? Suspicious? Cautious? Guarded? Worried? Contemptuous, even? Was I? I don’t know. I don’t think so. But that could be because, now that I’m here, they all sound pretty nutty. What I am feeling is relaxed, comfortable, interested, at-ease—I’m having fun.

At 12:30 (on the dot) Wayne starts things off with the usual reminders—no flash photography; phones off. This, of course, gets a big laugh, as we’ve all just sacrificed our devices for the day. “But,” says Wayne, throwing us a bone, “for those of you who really need your phones . . . at the break . . . we will have counselors available to help you.”

During the first session we hear stories about fatherhood, nerds, intelligence, change, reentry, Abe Lincoln, enemies, and the talent, abilities, and charity that can be found inside these prison walls.

At the break, I meet an inmate named Todd and find out he is the same Todd whose art was just featured in Najmuddeen Salaam’s talk. I also find out that when Naj said Todd had made a grandfather clock “by hand” he meant by hand. No power tools. No tools. To shape the molding Todd used a paper clip.

In the second session, we hear about gardening, laughter, inner demons, and, again, the earlier themes of family, inmate philanthropy, reentry, social acceptance, and the lack thereof.

What I can say about the talks is: watch them. I’d suggest in order, but if you’d prefer to start with some laughs, try FrankHerrington&Co or Ricky. If you’re ready to jump headlong into heart wrenching, it’s a toss-up, but I’ll suggest Diego. For a sound argument, there’s Juan. For inspiration, you could go with the inmate who figured out how to stock neighboring food banks or the one who’s an expert fundraiser for individuals in need. With either one, Ben or Jim, you’ll also get heart wrenching and hilarity—they do say that in prison humor is a matter of survival.

Of the eleven talks, six are by inmates, one by a former inmate, and four by not-ever inmates. The sessions also include two TED videos, one dance, and two musical performances. Without a doubt, the inmates are the most compelling speakers, though each of the other four share information worth hearing or a perspective necessary to the whole conversation.


I would like to say more about the talks themselves, but the truth is every time I try, I fail. I’ll start thinking about Diego’s talk, where he traces his downfall to the essential mistake of leaving his baby son and his redemption to renewing that relationship, and my mind spills over to the conversation I had with a “lifer” and his fiancé about their relationship, and also to the between-talks spontaneous hug between Dan and his daughter.

I’ll consider the talk by Ben, who asks, “Will I have to move to another country to be a citizen again?” and his question becomes utterly inseparable from everything I’ve experienced that day: talks; interactions; witnessing others interact; standing in line in the “chow hall;” the hoots and hollers from the audience; the fact that the first to hoot was Marion’s own warden; Jim’s Chinet-plate painting I walk out the door with and his hilariously wry and moving talk explaining it; and even later hearing myself say “I had dinner with two lifers” and knowing how weird that sounds and how not even close to weird it was.

TEDx was introduced as a democratization of TED and what better example than TEDxMarionCorrectional: The oft-called “elitist” TED brings us inside our most disparaged and ghettoized community. At the same time, I wish the TED rules might bend a bit for this event. Watching online you’ll see what happened on the red circle on the stage, but you won’t get to know Wayne, nor will you hear Rusty’s banter as emcee. You won’t see the Speed TEDxing sessions, or dinner in the “pollination station.” Watch anyway.

But as you do, understand that at TEDxMarionCorrectional, what is talked about on stage—life inside; life outside; the preparation, transition, connection, division between the two—is exactly what is happening off stage.

It is a powerful thing to experience and as can happen with powerful experiences, I walked out a different person than I walked in. It’s a cliché I won’t even try to avoid. But I will try to be more specific:

For starters, there’s how I think about the question: Would you ever hire an ex-prisoner?

Before: I would have entertained this theoretical question.
After: I realize it’s not a question. It’s the same as asking, “Would you hire a human?” To which the answer is: “Depends, which human?”

Before: I would have accepted “better safe than sorry” as an understandable response to this question.
After: I understand that there is no “better safe then sorry.” To reduce a person to one thing, and then use it to deny what is offered to others, is always dangerous.
It’s not as if I didn’t know this before—it’s Humanity 101—but I needed the inmates at Marion to help me practice it.

Before: I didn’t think about who was behind the walls at Marion.
After: I know there are some impressive people behind those walls. Many are doing more good for the world certainly than I am. I hold this knowledge right alongside an understanding and sensitivity to the reality that, to some, just to hear the name of these men is painful.

I left TEDxMarionCorrectional with a new and intensely sharp clarity on some things and perpetually unresolvable confusion on many others, including the discordant fact that the point of prison is to keep those inside separate from me, yet in breaking that separation my life is enriched.

Don’t misunderstand, no part of me is calling for those walls to come down and my inner skeptic remains alive and well: I get that I saw one pre-approved slice of one prison and I’m also aware that prisons reward good behavior in a way that life does not. But my skeptic is also smarter now, more just, and less prone to turn a fact into an excuse for prejudice or an eraser of good deeds.

I also left TEDxMarionCorrectional feeling lucky. For my freedom? No, turns out I need to work on my gratitude because that was not my first thought. I felt lucky for having gone in. All I did was type my name into Eventbrite and clear one Sunday, and in return I received the huge gift of this experience. For next year, I know what I’m getting into and I can’t wait.

Kendra Hovey is editor and head writer at Follow This. On Twitter @KendraHovey, she blogs at kendrahovey.com

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We’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you, for our Friday Favorites blog series.

This week, Suzanne Beachy (full bio below) TEDxColumbus 2010 speaker shares her favorite talks.

Jake Shimabukuro: “Bohemian Rhapsody”

Robert Gupta: Music is medicine, music is sanity

Sebastian Wernick: Lies, damned lies and statistics (about TEDTalks)

Eleanor Longden: Learning from the voices in my head

Elizabeth Gilbert:Your elusive creative genius

A mom since 1980, Suzanne Beachy began packing school lunches for her son Jake in 1986. Twenty-four years later, she is still packing school lunches for her young kids, Natalie and Collin. In addition to the usual mommish duties of cleaning up messes and attending to the needs of young digestive systems, Suzanne has worked for pay as a music librarian, bass player, stage hand, professional letter writer and copy editor, and as a partner in her husband Tim’s building business. Suzanne was a TEDxColumbus 2010 speaker.

 

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