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As you prepare for Friday’s TEDxColumbus: STEAM at the Capitol Theater, 77 South High Street, here are some specifics you will need to make it a spectacular day.

11:30 am – Registration Opens (pre-registration encouraged – see below)

Noon – Lunch

12:45 pm – Doors Open to Capitol Theater

1:00 pm – Program Begins

1:00 pm – 5:30 pm Three sessions of speakers and two breaks

5:30 pm – Program Ends, Happy Hour!

Our hashtag is #tedxcbus.

Registration

We are encouraging everyone who has purchased a ticket to pre-register by filling out this form with your name and email. Because CAPA/Ticketmaster could only capture the “purchaser” names – we don’t have everyone’s participants names. If you don’t pre-register, it’s okay, we can take care of you when you arrive. (If you have purchased for a group, you may send us a list to tedxcolumbus@gmail.com). DEADLINE for pre-registration is Wednesday at 6pm.

If you don’t pre-register, not to worry, we can register you at the door (just please be patient).

Where to park. 

Please consider using COTA, Car2Go or CoGo first!

If you are driving, we encourage parking at Columbus Commons. Everything within immediate proximity to the Riffe Center will be full.

How to arrive.

1. Curious and open. The speakers are coming prepared to provoke, it is your role to let them!

2. Willing to meet a stranger – or two. And have some amazing conversations.

3. By noon for lunch.  (Options for all dietary types and preferences – Vegan, GF, Carnivore). If you don’t want to have lunch, make sure to arrive by 12:45pm when the doors open for seating. All seats are general admission. We will begin very promptly at 1pm.

4. In comfortable clothes (seriously, jeans are encouraged).

5. With a creative name tag!  Of course we’ll have name tags for everyone – but judges will be roaming the breaks looking for creative expressions that you made with your own hands – and awarding drink tickets for ones they love.  (Check out the 2011 archive for inspiration). It is an awesome way to spark conversation, trust us.

If you want some reading preparation.

Take a look at the speakers’ profiles. It will help you understand their license to share their ideas. If you have seen a TED / TEDx talk, you know there isn’t any reviewing of biographies inside a talk – and we don’t do it in their live introductions either.

If you want to read more about the TEDx experience, here are some TEDxColumbus Follow This blog posts about who you might meet, why people came last year (with event reflections) and if this is your first time, some history on the origin of the event.

If you know someone that wanted to attend but can’t since we are sold out.

Please encourage them to attend the free Livestream viewing event at McConnell Arts Center in Worthington. No registration is necessary.

What you can do after TEDxColumbus. 

On Saturday, November 8th from 9am – noon, tune into TEDxYouth@Columbus. This partner event will be live streamed from COSI featuring ideas worth spreading from local High School speakers.

We will send you a link to a very important evaluation. Please take the 5 minutes to fill it out and be totally honest.  Many of the changes we made to this year’s event came from those evals last year.

The talks should be posted by Thanksgiving (no promises, but that’s our goal). We encourage you to share those ideas that provoked you.

All of the photos from the day will be posted to our Flickr account, which also is an archive of the past five year’s events.

If you want to be involved in any future TEDxColumbus or TEDxColumbusWomen planning, please email us tedxcolumbus@gmail.com.

And we love to partner with other TEDx programs at schools, universities, corporations and of course, prisons! The more good ideas we can spread, the better.

See you Friday! As always, let us know if you have questions – tedxcolumbus@gmail.com.

TEDxColumbus Organizing Team

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On March 20, 2014 at COSI (333 West Broad Street), we will be streaming a day of the 30th Anniversary TED conference. This means you can come watch what a live TED event is like (unedited, before the talks get prettied-up for YouTube) with friends and colleagues (old and new) at a local venue with free admission.

Lunch is on your own which you can purchase in the COSI cafe; and parking is available at nearby meters or in the COSI lot.  You can come for one or all of the sessions.

Here’s our local schedule of the sessions we will be streaming.

(If you research into the TED.com website, you will notice these talks are happening on a different day, but because of the time zone difference and large breaks they take at the actual conference, we “tape delay” them for a more accommodating event for our community. )

No registration is required. When you arrive, look for the signs to the Galaxy Theater on level 2 where the stream will take place.

If you have any questions, please email us at tedxcolumbus@gmail.com. We hope to see you on Thursday, March 20!

 

10:00 – 11:45 am

 

(Lunch Break – 11:45 am- 12:45 pm)

Session: Retrospect
  • Technology designer
  • Architect
  • Documentary filmmaker
  • Music Producer and DJ
12:45 pm – 2:30pm Session: Reshape
  • Plasma physicist
  • Urban planner
  • Cruciverbalist
  • Type designer
2:45 pm – 4:30 pm Session: Wish
  • Climate scientist
  • Philanthropist
  • Philanthropist
  • Peace activist
  • Wishmaker
  • Composer, singer, author, actor, activist
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TEDxChange@TEDxKibera

Wednesday, April 3 Melinda Gates will present TEDxChange live from Seattle, Washington. Themed Positive Disruption, TEDxChange 2013 speakers will challenge preconceived ideas, spark discussion, engage leaders and shed light on new perspectives.

Join the TEDxColumbus community to watch the livestream of this thought-provoking event at resource from Noon- 2 p.m. Wednesday, April 3. To register to attend, click here. For more information on TEDxChange, click here.

TED.com says:

Disruption is usually unwelcome. It represents conflict, chaos, and potential danger. We discourage disruptive behavior in our homes and our societies, often favoring passivity and compliance.

But disruption can be a positive – sometimes vital – catalyst for change. It can challenge old assumptions, ignite conversations, activate authorities and expose new possibilities. Disruption can shed a unique light on difficult issues, giving a fresh urgency and perspective to the challenges of our global community.

To solve the most intractable challenges in health and development, we need positive disruption. It is the path to true progress.

 

 

 

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Follow This, TEDxColumbus, TEDxWomen, Viewing Events

[by Kendra Hovey]

I’ll start with some facts:

  • TEDxWomen is for everyone. It is, explains host Pat Mitchell, “for a world that needs the full participation of women and their ideas, their experiences, their compassion and convictions, their activism and their artistry.”
  • Women and men speak at TEDxWomen.
  • Women and men attend TEDxWomen, though, to date, women in much greater numbers.
  • The talks at TEDxWomen are as universally relevant as the talks at TED.
  • 15,000 people watched TEDxWomen 2012 at various live viewing events across 53 countries.
  • “The Space Between”—this year’s theme—refers to the gray, the and, the full spectrum that lives between polarities, be they black/white, rich/poor, work/family, right/left, male/female…

Next, some history:

  • TEDWomen launched in 2010 as a TED conference.
  • The x was added in 2011. Because of the large number of local TEDxWomen events that sprouted alongside TEDWomen, the TEDx community was thought to be a more logical home.
  • Talks from the past two conferences have been viewed 20 million times and translated into 50 languages.

Now, an opinion:

  • TEDxWomen is fast becoming my favorite TED-related event.

Like TED, TEDxWomen blows my mind, captivates, educates, stirs and moves me. It also has the benefits built into TEDx, namely, access to the fascinating nooks and crannies of life that (big)TED is sometimes too big to see.

By the same token, TEDxWomen shares the realities of TEDx: less time, energy, resources—less rigor—and as a result there are some talks that don’t quite hit their mark.

But where TEDxWomen beats all is the connecting. Interaction is part of the TED platform—if you attended TEDxColumbus you might remember introducing yourself to your neighbors and lunching with five (now former) strangers.

At the TEDxColumbus TEDxWomen event, this element is seamless and unprompted.

TEDxColumbusWomen 2012For whatever reason, people tend to bring and express their full selves—not a compartmentalized professional one. As a result, discussions get rich and interesting real fast. In short, it’s fun.

It also makes perfect sense for TED. Watch almost any TEDTalk and invariably the subject percolated and took shape out of this inseparable mix of passion, personal and professional.

But exactly how this ease in expression and connection I see at TEDxWomen happens, I can’t say. And how to tap into it on a larger scale . . . I wish I knew.

This question—how to scale-up?—came up again, in fact, almost every time a speaker shared yet another project, idea, model, theory or good work.

One particularly poignant example is the counter-terrorism efforts of Edit Schlaffer, Archana Kapoor and Arshi Saleem Hashmi that enabled Pakistani and Indian women, both, to move from victimhood, and the defaults of fear and hate, to agency, understanding and empathy.

 

Some quotes:

“The loss of a son, no matter whose son, is the loss of a son.”

 

“Terrorists know how to use the power of women, why do not counter-terrorists?”

 

 

 

Another great quote from the day comes from John Gerzema, who said:

“Femininity is the Operating System of 21st century progress.”

Maybe you want to pause…go back, read that again. It’s quite an interesting thing to say, isn’t it?


It is the basic idea of what he calls the Athena Doctrine. Surveying as many as 60,000 across the globe, Gerzema found that character traits classified as “feminine” were rated as highly important for leadership, success, morality and happiness. “Feminine values,” he states, “are ascendant.” I, personally, would love to see what more empathy, respect, patience, expressiveness and flexibility, among other traits, would do for the world. I hope he is right. But I would also like to see research on the correlation between what people say they want and what people actually do.
TEDxColumbusWomen 2012
Four reasons (and there are undoubtedly more) to watch Eboo Patel’s talk are:

  1. it’s a great trajectory story (how I got from there to here);
  2. Patel speaks about faith in a way meaningful to believer, non-believer and all that’s in-between;
  3. if you don’t already know about Dorothy Day, you will; and
  4. trust me, you don’t want to miss out on meeting his grandmother.

Two speakers, Angela Patton and Shabana Basij-Rasikh, share particularly poignant stories about the importance of fathers.

[When the Taliban threatened Basij-Rasikh’s father with death if he didn’t stop his daughter from going to school, he said this: “Kill me now if you wish, but I will not ruin my daughter’s future.”]


The target of a massive online misogyny and harassment campaign, Anita Sarkeesian’s appalling, eventually hopeful, but still appalling, story is essential viewing, and her analysis increasingly relevant.

The talks I mention are just a few of many that struck a chord. TEDxWomen covered a range of topics from transcendental meditation, computer programming, street art, autism, the “war” on obesity, the freedom of a wheelchair, the benefits of getting lost, and more—plus those still to be discovered as I watch the last 20 or so online.

One presenter, the explorer and “way-finder” Elizabeth Lindsey, is concerned that we have come to live our lives by “fickle criteria.” “We are following the wrong stars,” she says, “we’re being sold a lifestyle when what we want most is a life.”

To continue her metaphor, one inspiring through-line in this year’s TEDxWomen is example after example after example of people following different stars—and the innovative and positive destinations they create. And, from 17-year-old Brittany Wengar to CEO Charlotte Beers, one thing seems clear: Counter to what women, at least American women, have been told—to check their gender at the workplace door (and men, too, to check their femininity)—these stars shine brighter when we tap into and value the full range of who we are.

 Kendra Hovey is editor and head writer at Follow This. On Twitter @KendraHovey, she blogs at kendrahovey.com

Photos from TEDxWomen by John Lash c/o The Paley Center for Media;  Photos from viewing event by Allyson Kuentz c/o TEDxColumbus

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We get asked all the time by other TEDx organizers what our financial model is.  We’re thrilled to share it here as we’ve worked hard the last few years to figure what will work best.

We have a special fund at the Columbus Foundation, our community foundation, set up to receive contributions from individuals and corporations that want to support TEDxColumbus. COSI, our local center of science and industry (think children’s museum meets awesome science center) then acts as our fiscal agent, receiving the money from the TEDx Fund and also ticket sales. They in turn, pay all the expenses for the event.

We aim for our expenses for our event match our income. Our major line-items include technology and production; event staging, lighting and sound; food for attendees; parking and printing. We get a massive amount of goods and services donated – such as all of our creative, photography, web support, animation and mobile application.  We have a special grant that underwrites basic event coordination expenses which allows the event to be sustainable and is applied to web updates, speaker coordination, sponsorship fulfillment, ticket monitoring, volunteer oversight, vendor coordination and social media and community engagement. At the end of the event if we have overage (income exceeds expenses), we apply it to next year’s event and/or our minimal expenses on our viewing events (TEDGlobal, TEDxChange, TEDxWomen, TEDxKids) and our ongoing outreach efforts (Follow This, our blog, and Readers’ Roundtable, our book outreach series).

Many communities are still at a loss on how to organize with a fiscal agent. As COSI as our host, we are blessed with a symbiotic relationship which helps manage our back-office at no additional cost to us, while allowing us to focus on curating the best event possible.

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TEDxColumbus in conjunction with TEDxOhioStateUniversity will be hosting two viewing events to show a full day of TED talks from the 2012 Conference in Long Beach on March 1. One venue will be at the brand new TechDEC (a sister location to the Dublin Entrepreneurial Center), conveniently located at the Metro Center off Frantz Rd, where the three sessions (15 speakers) will be shown from 10am – 4pm. The same set of talks will be shown at the Barnes & Noble at  South Campus Gateway from 3pm – 9pm. These events are free and open to the public. Click here for more details and the complete speaker schedule.

These events are part of our ongoing commitment to bring more opportunities to enjoy inspiration, innovation and idea sharing throughout the year. We are proud to have support from Turnstone and Resource Interactive to make these events possible.

By the way — If this is the first time you are seeing TEDxOhioStateUniversity it’s because their first live event is on March 31 at the Ohio Union! We are proud to be collaborating with them in this viewing event and expect to be doing more of the same in the future!

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A big thank you to everyone who joined us yesterday for the MLK Day Talkathon! It was a great afternoon of talks and discussion at Studio 35.

 

Getting ready to enjoy an afternoon of inspiration

 

Discussion during the break at Studio 35 in Clintonville.

 

Enjoying a break with coordinators Ruth Milligan (center left) and Dave Ungar (center right).

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Join us this year for these TED Conference viewing events.  Each will be free but will require registration (which will go live 30 days before each event).

TED Conference

Wednesday, February 28

Broadcast from Long Beach, CA

Viewing Location: TBD

 

TEDxChange

Thursday, April 5

hosted by Melinda French Gates

Broadcast from Berlin

Viewing Location: Resource Interactive

 

TEDGlobal

June

Broadcast from Edinburgh

Viewing Location: CCAD

 

TEDxWomen

Broadcast from New York

Date and Location TBD

 

 

 

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Our friends at Studio 35 have generously opened up their theater to us on MLK day from 2pm – 5:00pm to view a great selection of TED and TEDx talks. Our goal is to reflect on some important messages by watching a series of inspired talks together. And also stay warm on what is usually a frigid January day!

This is not an officially licensed TEDx event, just a gathering put together by those who do organize TEDxColumbus.

Details:

MLK Day Viewing Event

Monday, January 16, 2012

Location:  Studio 35, 3055 Indianola

Time:  Set one:  2pm – 3:15pm,  Break: 3:15 – 3:45pm; Set two: 3:45pm – 5:00pm.  Conversation can take place until 6pm.

Admission: Free

Concessions:  Will be open. Pizza can be ordered. Beer, popcorn, candy for sale.

Registration: Not required. If you plan on bringing a big group of students, please let us know here so we can make sure to accomodate you.

Parking: Available on the Indianola until 4pm on both sides of the street. But at 4pm, parking is permitted on the east side of Indianola (read: you will be towed). Please plan accordingly.

Talks to be shown: (Listed as played on 1/16/12)

Simon Sinek: How great leaders inspire action

Derek Sivers: How to start a movement

Sheryl WuDunn: Our century’s greatest injustice

Eli Pariser: Beware online “filter bubbles”

Majora Carter: Greening the ghetto

Mallika Sarabhai: Dance to change the world

Michael Sandel: The lost art of democratic debate

Karen Tse: How to stop torture

Richard Wilkinson: How economic inequality harms societies

Natalie Warne: Being young and making an impact

Brene Brown: The Power of Vulernability 

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In the last month, we’ve hosted a myriad of TEDx events in Columbus. Here’s a quick re-cap to summarize them – and showing what a vibrant, curious, inspired city we have that is supporting and growing each one.

Our signature event, TEDxColumbus, featured 18 speakers and performers (above: Susan Willeke, Jamie Greene and Rose Smith) on stage at COSI on 11.11.11.  You can watch all of the speaker’s videos here, or get a glimpse of the full day from still images here.  They all celebrated a “Moment in Time,” and did so beautifully.

We had a record turnout of nearly 600 attendees, that’s double where we started two years ago when we hosted the first event at the Wexner center with 300 attendees.  Check out this dynamic gallery at COSI!

We were supported these amazing corporate and community partners: resource interactive, The Columbus Foundation, Barnes and Thornburg, The Limited Brands, Alliance Data, The Ohio State University, and GSW Worldwide. Support from WOSU, COSI and a host of other in-kind donations made the event possible.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

We had a unique and very special partnership with LOTH/ STEELCASE / TURNSTONE to outfit the event gallery for our two days of events (see TEDxYouth below). The feedback on our event was so spectacular in part thanks to the great furniture and environment they helped to build for us. We were delighted they could carry through our dream!

The day before TEDxColumbus, we hosted TEDxYouth@Columbus also at COSI, where 18 speakers and performers also took the stage and inspired an audience of nearly 150 high schoolers. Curators Andy Aichele and Christian Long were aided by community volunteers who were also mentors in the afternoon, the day-long event turned out to be a needed and inspired addition to our TEDx line-up. And the kids had a blast, too.

 

After we cleaned up from TEDxColumbus and TEDxYouth@Columbus, on December 1, for the second year in a row, The Columbus Foundation hosted a livestream of TEDxWomen, a national TEDx event that was broadcast from LA and NY. Over 60 women joined us for the viewing and lots of great conversation between riveting talks. See an additional story here from our live speakers Maryanna Klatt and Theresa Flores who joined us with their TEDxColumbus talks at lunch.

And for us, we closed out the month with a webinar featuring our own InsideOut Project along side TEDx organizers from Aviero, Portgual, Manchester, NH and Athens, Greece. I have been hosting  some of these  webinars for two years now – bringing together knowledge and experience for TEDx organizers around the world. This one was pretty special as we had JR, the artist and recipient of the TED Prize and Amy Novogratz, join us to discuss InsideOut. The webinar will be linked here when it’s live.

 

All in all, the community has had an exhilarating month – thanks to everyone who’s helped to make these great moments possible!

 

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