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It’s our fifth year.  How did THAT happen?

And while we aren’t going to have someone jump out of plane to celebrate, we are proud to announce what might be our most ambitious line up in the short history of TEDxColumbus.  Join us on October 11 from 9-4 (with happy hour until 5) at COSI to witness this collection of thinkers, researchers, provocateurs, rainmakers, entertainers and game-changers, all of whom, in their own right, are doing things truly OUT THERE. Come join a dynamic crowd of curious folks to be collectively provoked, challenged and inspired, while connecting, conversing and processing it all together.

A few changes from past year’s events:  We have selected more speakers  — but to speak for shorter times, upon audience request.  We’ve curated two special groups to join our expected, provocative talks.  Here is the complete lineup (access their bios and abstracts through the speaker home page here).

For being OUT THERE in their investigations, solutions, ideas, courage or reach.  Talks include:

  • On rebuilding cities, Mohamed Ali.
  • On global warming, David Bromwich .
  • On gender fluidity, Gabrielle Burton.
  • On revolutionizing hacking, Chris Domas.
  • On finding new planets, Scott Gaudi.
  • On giving back out there, when you are in there, Jim Fussell
  • On a basic unmet human need, Nancy Kramer.
  • On the courage to change, Decker Moss.
  • On reaching deep inside the brain, Ali Rezai.
  • On new rules for systems, Joe Simkins.
  • On entertaining us,  Tobin-Wilcox and The Castros.

Five in five.  (Okay, we did want to celebrate being five.)

For being OUT THERE in their passions –  in five minutes each.

  • On writing through logic, Miriam Bowers Abbott.
  • On paying attention, Chris Fraser.
  • On exploring within, Josh Hara.
  • On coming out of the valley, Stephanie Hughes.
  • On a dynamic bike city, Jess Mathews.

Sensory Talks. Playing on the five theme (last time, promise!), we’ve invited a group of speakers to share an incredible range of thinking on our five main senses.

  • On smells in a city, Dax Blake.
  • On our scent and taste memory, Tom Knotek.
  • On saving sight, Kaweh Mansouri.
  • On the power of touch, Lori Guth Moffett.
  • On challenging the ability to listen, Susan Nittrouer.

And we encourage you to move quickly if you’d like to attend.  We expect, as always, tickets to sell out. Tickets can be purchased here.

TEDxColumbus 2013 is made possible with support of the following partners:

Lead Sponsor, resource.

Event Partners, The Columbus Foundation, The Doug and Monica Kridler Fund of the Columbus Foundation, Limited Brands Foundation, Cardinal Health and The Ohio State University.

Presenting Sponsors, GSW Worldwide, Ologie, Crane Group, Glimcher, IntoGreat, Alliance Data, Crimson Cup,

Media Partner, WOSU

Host Partner, COSI and Host Supporter, Susan Leohner Events.

Creative Support is provided by Base Art Co., Spacejunk Media, and BonFire Red.

 

 

 

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We’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you, for our Friday Favorites blog series.

This week, Brian Roche (full bio below) TEDxColumbus 2012 speaker shares his favorite talks.

 

1. Salman Khan: Let’s use video to reinvent education

 

2. Theresa Flores: Find a Voice with Soap

 

3. Jill Bolte Taylor’s stroke of insight

 

4. Terrell Strayhorn:Inalienable Rights: Life, Liberty, and the Pursuit of Belonging

 

5. Brené Brown: The power of vulnerability

 

Brian Roche, Ph.D., is a board certified toxicologist with more than 15 years of experience in cardiovascular, respiratory and CNS safety pharmacology research and is currently the manager of Battelle’s safety pharmacology research group. His research has focused on toxicological and pharmacological evaluations, including QT interval assessments, of drug candidates that are advancing to the Food and Drug Administration’s Initial New Drug application and clinical studies. Additionally, Brian is the technical lead for development of predictive and translatable model systems to investigate drug-induced cardiac injury.

Batelle Safety Pharmacologist, Brian Roche outlines his case that surviving chemotherapy for cancer treatment has consequences.  For up to 15% of patients receiving chemo, there is irreversible cardiac damage. Brian was a 2012 TEDxColumbus speaker.

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Events, Follow This, TEDxColumbus, TEDxMarionCorrectional

The first ever TEDx in an adult prison held its second TEDx on April 21, 2013. To tell the story of this uncommon event we decided to share perspectives from both sides of the prison walls. Our editor and first-time TEDxMarionCorrectional attendee, Kendra Hovey, shared her experience in our May post “From Outside In.” Now we hear about the event “From Inside Out.” Below is our interview (questions submitted, answers returned, all in writing) with five guys on the inside: Dan and Wayne (co-founders and co-curators, and identified as such with an asterick*) as well as attendees Dave, John, and William. But before we begin, a few facts:

  • TEDxMarionCorrectional is hosted by the institution (medium security) and held within its walls.
  • It was founded by inmates Dan and Wayne, who also curate along with Jo Dee Davis (director of Healing Broken Circles) and Jordan Edelheit (student and founder of TEDxOhioStateUniversity).
  • Both Dan and Wayne were introduced to TED while incarcerated at Marion Correctional Institution.   
  • The inaugural event, A Life Worth Living? (9.16.12), was highlighted at TED 2013 and on the TED blog.
  • The curators have been asked to consult on other prison events including the upcoming TEDxSanQuentin (9.20.13).
  • The audience at the second event, titled What’s Next?, was split down the middle: 149 inmates (chosen through an application process), 152 outsiders (registered after entering their name on a sign-up form). Outsiders were a mix. Our editor met a college student, a foundation president, a software guy and a yoga instructor. The event is also live streamed throughout the prison so the entire inmate population (approx: 2,500) has the option to watch.
  • Inmates are identified by first name only in accordance with rules guarding victims’ rights.


TEDxMarionCorrectional: From Inside Out
An interview with Dan, Dave, John, Wayne & William
  

FT: Many inmates were curious about how those from the outside felt about the experience of coming into a prison, what did it feel like for you to have the general public inside?

Wayne*: It is nice to be a host. I don’t often (ever) get the opportunity to have company over, in a social setting…

FT: …And did you have concerns or preconceptions about us?

Dave: I figured there would be some who had issues about coming inside these walls . . . but I was sure we could change their perception.

John: I felt very excited about meeting people from the general public. I know from TV and newspapers that the public is tough on crime. So when the conversation is about inmates the majority of people put up a wall and close their minds. Being able to share with people with an open mind was very enlightening and a new experience. I was very happy with the care that the public showed us.


FT: …So as far as your actual experience interacting with the general public…?

Dan*: I love it! The rapidity that we as a group move past small talk into substantive conversation is somewhat incredible and maybe impossible anywhere else. I am blown away by the organic nature of the day.

Dave: The entire experience for me was awesome. I spoke at the last one so I got to experience this one without the nerves and pressure of performing.

William: [People] seemed genuinely impressed and maybe even a little relieved to learn that something of substance was taking place within these walls.


FT: Turning for a moment to curatorial guidelines—and this is directed to Dan and Wayne—what criteria did you use to choose your speakers? 

Wayne*: Wait! There are curatorial guidelines???

Dan*: Auditions are open to the general population of the prison…

Wayne*: We ask for a rough guideline of their idea. Then anything worth looking at, we tape a five-minute version of their talk and, from there, we choose to work with the guys that had a “something.”

Dan*: Those in the disciplinary housing units were excluded from the audition process by the Warden’s guidelines, as were any men with disciplinary problems in the last 12 months. Other than that, our talkers could be from any socio-economic background and have any educational level. We don’t exclude anyone due to the crime they committed or their criminal history.


FT: In most of the inmate talks this year, both the life experiences that led to crime and the crime itself are acknowledged, but deemphasized—at least as compared to last year’s talks. Was this a curatorial choice? Also, do victim rights limit what inmates can tell about their story?

Dan*: This was a curatorial choice for the most part. After the first event, a lot of the feedback from guys in here was that they could go to any self-help group or AA meeting and hear personal testimonies. This year we kept an eye out for those with an idea or theory that, while not a testimony, was still unique to an inmate’s point of view and true to our theme…

Wayne*: We wanted to move towards a more normal TEDx event. However, having only ever seen two events, we worked towards what we thought a normal event would be like…

Dan*: We still tried to get our talkers to use their personal stories as a vehicle to carry their idea to the audience.

Wayne*: I don’t really know if there are any guidelines on this issue [victim rights]. We assumed there were and made decisions we felt were appropriate. We didn’t censor, we just tried to be sensitive.

Dan*: Not sure if there is a legal limit, however I think there is a limit to what guys are willing to share. Especially in a video that everyone will be able to see forever. Personally, I don’t think fondly of the kid I was at age 21 and I can’t expect anyone else to. So how do I reveal myself enough to show my authenticity without losing my standing in their eyes? Is that, or should that be a factor?


FT: Directed to everyone now, which talks were your favorites?

Dan*: Might as well ask me which of my kids is my favorite! I did have a lot of guys commenting on how awesome the b-boy/b-girl dance piece was [Deryk]. Nothing like that had hit our prison stage before.

Dave: Frank & Company just because that shit was funny.

John: Jim’s “Domino Deeds” was my favorite talk. I’ve known him for 30+ years. Most of the men that are “old-law” and in for capital crimes are very remorseful for their crime and just want to do some good in this world. They’re tired of hating and being hated. I love his idea of paying it forward and helping someone, somehow.

Wayne*: On the day of the event, I truly enjoyed Deryk and Jim—for the inside information I had. In prison, Deryk has had no opportunities to practice his art and the little practice time he got with the outside dancers on Saturday and Sunday was great for him. Jim has been incarcerated for a very long time and never spoke to a group larger than could sit at a picnic table. The courage he displayed in taking the stage was incredible. It helped that both performances were flat out amazing.


FT: Did any talk particularly resonate with your own experience?

Dan*: I think each of the talks affected me in some way, just as every conversation I had during the day did. But I really connected to Diego’s talk. I also had this fantastic conviction that I wouldn’t be like my dad. I would be there, I would keep my promises, I wouldn’t be violent and I wouldn’t make them Browns fans . . .. But then I also abandoned them with my terrible life decisions.

William: Yes, Diego’s talk really touched me. I’m not afraid to admit that I openly wept. The loss of the relationship with my son has been the hardest thing to deal with during my near ten years of incarceration. I’ve missed so much and have no one to blame but myself…

Wayne*: Ben’s thought that I may have to leave the country to be a citizen again really resonated with me. I’ll always face the Google problem.

Dave: Jim’s talk grabbed me. I mentor people, and to see them do something they couldn’t before or to see them get a better understanding of life, or to watch them mature and build a deeper connection. It [mentoring] is like Jim’s paintings—the one life I took I’m trying to give back through it.


FT: Did you learn something new from any of the talks?

Wayne*: I gained something from each person that hit our stage, but the one that jumps out is Sam Grisham. For a chief of security of a prison to share his story like that is quite unique. The perspective he shared of his job was insightful.

Dan*: Another voice that needed to be heard was Rickey’s [“Intelligence is the New Swagger”]. We need to counter the culture of failure that our kids are bombarded with and Rickey’s talk might reach those that Glee won’t.

John: I know that it will be hard to adjust back into society, but after hearing Naj speak… his talents and qualifications should have outweighed his past, not to mention the number of years he served in here. If society was against him, how will they react to me after serving 40 years? Should I not even try to fit in, sparing society the embarrassment and me the heartache?


FT: Did this TEDx event have a positive effect on you? On other prisoners? In what ways?

Dan*: The inside guys got to see that they are still human beings, that prison hadn’t dehumanized them as much as they feared, and that society, albeit a small section of it, will still converse and interact with them.

John: If this event changed one person’s perception of life, that people change, and deserve a second chance, it could not help but have a positive effect on me and on all prisoners.

Dan*: And to have been able to somehow encourage a man to step out of his peer group and put his identity on the line to spread an idea or more importantly share his story is a positive effect if ever I’ve seen one.


FT: What do you see as the positive effects for those outside of prison?

William: To see first-hand that incarceration can in fact cause someone to re-evaluate themselves and their decision-making process, and begin anew.

John: A chance to look at people differently.

Dave: It allows us to connect with the public and allow them to see we still have something to offer the world.

Dan*: The 6 o’clock news mentions on a daily basis that someone has been sentenced to x amount of time. But what happens while they’re in prison? How are they treated? What program is offered and also facilitated successfully? And x implies that person will be returning to the community. How do you want us to return to your community? The not very good human I was when I came into these walls? Or as the human being who has lived up to his potential, lives each day wholeheartedly and with communal self-awareness? These are questions that those outside of prison need to ask. These are the conversations that need to happen more often than the tougher on crime conversations. It will take many more events before we as a society start to question whether we need to, or can, come up with a better way to lower crime and rehabilitate those that we incarcerate.

Wayne*: And it offers insight into a part of society that they had no idea was so large. With the number of people being incarcerated and released each year, aspects of prison culture have already seeped into mainstream culture. And you may not realize how many felons there are in every neighborhood in America. How a society chooses to deal with criminals impacts the overall health of society.


FT: What kinds of responses did you get, if any, from inmates who watched the event on the live stream?

Dave: That we are rock stars!—no, seriously, I am.

John: They all want to be part of TEDxMarionCorrectional. The two doormen were bombarded with guys wanting to enter into the event for session two.

Wayne*: Many were proud to know that such an event was taking place in “their” institution…

Dan*: Inspired. Inspired is the word I heard the most from guys. Inspired by the fact that a TEDx event could take place in prison. Inspired that they weren’t the only ones who thought the way our talkers (inside and outside) did. Inspired to hear that CEOs recognize the stark reality of social acceptance for ex-offenders and are working towards a remedy. Inspired…wow! Isn’t that what every TED talk aims to do? Not only inform its audience, but inspire action from its audience too?

FT: Thank you.

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We’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you, for our Friday Favorites blog series.

This week, Janice Rapp a TEDxColumbus enthusiast shares her favorite talks.

1. Suzanne Beachy: What’s next for the truth

 

2. Megan Jones: Making history

 

3. Theresa Flores: Find a voice with soap

 

4. David Burns: Heartache of education

 

5. Frederick Ndabaramiye:A brighter future than past

 

 

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We’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you, for our Friday Favorites blog series.

This week, Phil Cogley AKA “The Saturday Giant” (full bio below) TEDxColumbus 2010 performer shares his favorite talks.

1. Eric Whitacre: A virtual choir 2,000 voices strong

2. Suzanne Beachy: What’s next for truth?

3. Matt Slaybaugh: Finally, this is for you

4. Hans Rosling: Global population growth, box by box

5. Michael Wilkos: Surprise, it’s Columbus 2.0!

 

After a period of experimentation with a variety of recording techniques and instrumentation, and amidst a one year sojourn in Pittsburgh, Cogley set to work writing and recording his debut effort, a concept album titled You’ve Heard of Dragons. The Album posits the hypothetical scenario of world domination by malevolent reptilian humaniods (say that three times fast!) as a way of grappling with war, natural disasters, and the end of the world. Phil was a 2010 TEDxColumbus performer.

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We’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you, for our Friday Favorites blog series.

This week, Maryanna Klatt (full bio below) TEDxColumbus 2011 speaker shares her favorite talks.

1. Paul Zak: Trust, morality — and oxytocin?

 

2. Terri Wahl: Minding your Mitochondria

 

3. Brené Brown: Listening to shame

 

4. Atul Gawande: How do we heal medicine?

 

5. Dr. Mimi Guarneri: Shifting the Healthcare Paradigm

 

Maryanna Klatt, Ph.D. is an Associate Professor, in the College of Medicine at Ohio State University, teaching undergraduates, graduate students, medical students, and Family Medicine Residents. The focus of her teaching, research and practice is Integrative Medicine, which is the practice of medicine that reaffirms the importance of the relationship between practitioner and patient, focuses on the whole person, is informed by scientific evidence, and makes use of all appropriate therapeutic approaches to achieve optimal health and healing. She created and directs an interdisciplinary minor at OSU, Integrative Approaches to Health and Wellness. Her students are the health care providers of tomorrow and she is energized by their commitment to understanding the whole person of the patient. Teaching has been a source of joy in her life.

Dr. Klatt’s research focus has been to develop and evaluate feasible, cost-effective ways to reduce the risk of stress-related chronic illness, for both adults and children. Trained in Mindfulness and a certified yoga instructor through Yoga Alliance, she combines these two approaches in a unique approach to stress prevention/reduction. Her adult Mindfulness-Based Intervention, Mindfulness in Motion, is delivered at the worksite, while the program for children, Fuel for Learning is a classroom based intervention. Both programs combine yoga, mindfulness, and relaxing music, yielding stress reduction, increased quality of sleep, and improvements in problem behavior often related to stress in children. She has published several articles and book chapters, and has presented her work at national and international scientific conferences. Dr. Klatt believes that we can get more out of life by slowing down, reorienting each day to what is most essential in life. Mindfulness is the art of being present for one’s life- and all it has to offer. It is a self regulatory skill that can be learned. Mindfulness teaches people how to become aware of their thoughts, feelings, and body, without judgment. It exposes stress as the result of our response to life events (big and small) and places stress reduction within the individual- the most local of levels. Dr. Klatt believes that there is an unexplored mine of low cost, high yield movement and meditation practices that have broad pragmatic value. Her goal is to expose people to mindfulness, yoga, and breathing techniques that can be done during the day, in the environment in which they spend their day, helping them achieve the life and balance that they desire.

Maryanna and her husband Bill, an Appellate Judge on the 10th District Court of Appeals, have three grown children, Will (25), Anna (22), and Joseph (19) who are the best mindfulness teachers one could ever imagine. They are each passionate about life and want to leave the world a better place than they found it. Having a healthy marriage and parenting their children in tandem, have been the central foci of Maryanna and Bill’s personal and professional journeys, taken together. This is the central joy of her life. Maryanna was a 2011 TEDxColumbus Speaker

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We’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you, for our Friday Favorites blog series.

This week, Suzanne Beachy (full bio below) TEDxColumbus 2010 speaker shares her favorite talks.

Jake Shimabukuro: “Bohemian Rhapsody”

Robert Gupta: Music is medicine, music is sanity

Sebastian Wernick: Lies, damned lies and statistics (about TEDTalks)

Eleanor Longden: Learning from the voices in my head

Elizabeth Gilbert:Your elusive creative genius

A mom since 1980, Suzanne Beachy began packing school lunches for her son Jake in 1986. Twenty-four years later, she is still packing school lunches for her young kids, Natalie and Collin. In addition to the usual mommish duties of cleaning up messes and attending to the needs of young digestive systems, Suzanne has worked for pay as a music librarian, bass player, stage hand, professional letter writer and copy editor, and as a partner in her husband Tim’s building business. Suzanne was a TEDxColumbus 2010 speaker.

 

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Welcome to Friday Favorites, a new addition to the TEDxColumbus blog.
As we recognized (but not necessarily overtly celebrate) the fifth year of TEDxColumbus, we’ve invited our past TEDxColumbus speakers and other friends to give us their top five favorite talks to in turn, share with you.

We are starting with the favorites of Jordan Edelheit.  Her full bio is below, but suffice to say, she’s the gravity and force behind TEDxOhioStateUniversity and one of the co-organizers behind TEDxMarionCorrectional.   Enjoy her selections below.

 

1. Chimamanda Adichie: The danger of a single story

 

2. Natalie Warne: Being young and making an impact

 

3. Neil Pasricha: The 3 A’s of awesome

 

4. Bryan Stevenson: We need to talk about an injustice

 

5. Brené Brown: The power of vulnerability

 

Jordan Edelheit is currently studying Public Affairs at The Ohio State University, but more importantly is a social entrepreneur. She is the founder of TEDxOhioStateUniversity which now includes an incredible team of passionate students and an advisory board. Since introducing TEDxOhioStateUniversity in the fall of 2011 she has also spent time co-organizing a TEDx event at a venue quite different than a university setting– prison. The past half year was spent journeying to and from Marion organizing TEDxMarionCorrectional, attempting to make a positive impact within the incarceration system. Her newest project, The Driven (www.TheDriven.weebly.com), involved a seven week, 8,344 mile cross country road trip interviewing over 140 social entrepreneurs on what drives their passion. On campus she is involved with the service organization Ohio Staters, Inc which creates projects regarding the traditions of the university. She believes this university is a space of constant innovation and creativity and the intention of hosting a TEDx event is to create a platform to share ideas and let them continue to cultivate and grow!

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Follow This, Speakers, TEDxColumbus

 

[by Kendra Hovey]

If “Be Interesting” is on your to-do list today, you’re in luck, because Jessica Hagy’s blueprint for an interesting life is now in print (blue print, even). Described as a “small and quirky book with a large and universal message,” How to Be Interesting offers 200+ pages of insights, wisdoms and quips in pithy graphs, charts and diagrams.

Hagy previewed this project at the 2012 TEDxColumbus, sharing how she uses the tools of quantitative analysis to ponder some of the least quantifiable subjects—and also to poke some fun. It’s something she has been at for a long time now. In fact, her success today can be traced back to a doodle she made on a 3 x 5 card almost seven years ago.

“I was exhausted,” she says, “I was tired of working in a job that felt like an emotional dead-end, even if I was successful at it. I had no idea what to do with myself, and I was just doodling, trying to figure things out.”

That doodle became the inaugural post on Indexed, the blog she launched in 2006. There were more doodles on more 3 x 5 cards, more scans, more posts, and eventually Forbes came calling, as did others.

Hagy is originally from Cuyahoga Falls, Ohio. She was educated at Ohio University (BA) and Otterbein (MBA). After ten years in Columbus and one year in London, UK, she now lives in Seattle, which is where, between book tour travels, she took some time to chat with us over email about her new book and more.

 

 

Now that your work has been given some large-scale love, do you have any wisdom to share on having your talents recognized and rewarded?
The good: The internet is an equal opportunity playground, and you can do whatever you like out there. There is room for everyone to be successful online.

The bad: You’ll learn a lot about people by how they react when their friends succeed. Not everybody is going to be happy about your happiness, and that’s really gruesome to accept and process.

The ugly: It takes years of work and thought and learning to be perceived as an overnight success. Read all you can by as many people as you can (even people you don’t agree with or even like) and tinker a lot—trial and error can lead to all sorts of great stuff eventually, but you have to get through a lot of tough trials and embarrassing errors first.

You started out with a simple and straightforward format, the 3 x 5 card, is that still your initial medium?
It is for the blog [Indexed] but anymore I’m hired to do a lot of content that doesn’t fit so easily into that standardized format. Essays and animations and strategy things—I am a creative mercenary and change formats to fit what needs done instead of just repeating what’s been done because it’s the easiest route.

I imagine life is busier now, are you sticking with your regular gigs—Indexed, Forbes, etc?
I work for a handful of steady clients (like Forbes) and I am constantly taking on new projects, so yep, really busy. Being online, every morning I check my inbox, there’s a new connection or opportunity or bit of info that can change the way I work and think—it’s never the same day twice.

If there comes a time when Indexed feels “done” for you, how do you think you will know?
Right now it’s a healthy creative habit, making a little chart out to start out the morning. There might be a time when I want to sign off the internet and go become a tulip farmer or a clay thrower or something, but only time will tell. For now, I’ll keep doodling.

What was the experience of giving a TEDx Talk like for you?
It seems that these days, no matter what your profession, you have to be able to spin your work into a TED talk. It’s like toastmasters became a prerequisite for everybody from astronomers to chainsaw sculptors. “Of course I have a power point presentation for you, I’m a champion tap-dancing fishmonger, after all!”

The TED brand exudes (and demands in return) a calmly extroverted, upper middle-class, tech-driven business-casual optimism. So much other published content and so many other conferences get created to reflect the glow of TED’s trademarked crimson that you cannot escape the TED-curated Zeitgeist. And so I weave that knowledge into my powerpoint presentations, like a good little tap-dancing fishmonger.

Is there a “next” project on the horizon?
I’m working on a project with a lot of other cartoonists, a collection of cartoons all based on a shared image, a book of illustrated poetry, and lots more content for my current clients. I’m finishing up a manifesto in watercolors this week—it’ll be live in a month or so.

Lastly, any thoughts to share on how to survive, perhaps even thrive, as a writer during this particularly challenging moment in history?


 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Kendra Hovey is editor and head writer at Follow This. On Twitter @KendraHovey, she blogs at kendrahovey.com


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A few TEDx organizers and other Ohioians had the opportunity to attend this year’s TED Active conference in Palm Spring, CA last week. It was an amazing, memorable and exhausting week! Enjoy a little photo journey through our week in California.

TED Active is a much more relaxed setting than the main stage TED event in Long Beach. “The Quad” hosted many meals, discussions and late night events throughout the week of TED Active.

ACTIVE2013_0005883

Hosts Kelly Stoetzel and Rives keep the 800+ TEDActive attendees entertained and directed throughout the week at Palm Springs.

ACTIVE2013_0007382

TEDActive is known for its anti-Theater viewing areas, always complete with bean bags!

 

Organizers from TEDxColumbus & TEDxOhioStateUniversity enjoy a food truck dinner. (from L to R – Julie Columbro and Jordan Edelheit of TEDxOhioStateUniversity, Allyson Kuentz, Ruth Milligan and Judi Stillwell of TEDxColumbus)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ruth Milligan and Jordan Edelheit (TEDxOhioStateUniversity) and other TEDx organizers from around the world together with Laura Stein, TEDx Director (center), before going on stage to give a TEDx update at TED.

 

 

 

 

 

We loved the bookstore, curated by past and present TED speakers.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ruth found some Ohio friends at dinner, David and Luciana from Bath & Body Works!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Ohio was represented on the TED stage when Ruth and Jordan (TEDxMarionCorrectional) shared how TEDx has impacted their lives a session called “Inside TED.” (You can read more about the story on FOLLOW THIS)

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Allyson and Judi were lucky enough to get take a behind the scenes tour of the conference space in Long Beach, CA. Here is Allyson in one of the viewing spaces.

 

 

 

 

 

 

TEDx organizers from around the world gathered at a TEDx organizers workshop before the TED conference started. Of all the seats in the theater, Allyson managed to find a little piece of Columbus in the seat right next to her!

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

There were a variety of spaces to watch the conference including the “House of Design” which highlighted design innovation sponsored by Lincoln. This space quickly became a favorite gathering spot for attendees to enjoy well into the evening.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

“The Study” was another viewing location which highlighted the latest with the TED ED initiative.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

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